A delegation of officials of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints arrived in the territory Sunday afternoon,  in their capacity as the leaders of worldwide Women and Children Organizations visiting the South Pacific.  


Sister Rosemary M Wixom, General President of Primary in General Conference and Sister Linda K Burton General President of the Latter-day Saints' Relief Society Organization were accompanied by the Church's Pacific Area Presidency, Elder James J.Hamula, Elder Kevin W.Pearson and Elder F. Michael Watson.


On Sunday afternoon, Acting Governor Lemanu Peleti Mauga, his wife Pohakalani Mauga, Elder Fonoti Douglas Jessop and his wife Helen Jessop were at the governor’s lounge to welcome the six-member delegation.


Following their arrival, they held training and workshops at the Malaeimi Stake Center for church leaders to strengthen fellowship within Wards and Stakes and to encourage church members to care and look out for their brothers and sisters in Christ.


In addition to the workshops and training sessions, the delegation yesterday presented to the LBJ hospital a mammography and biopsy machine, where senior leaders Elder F Michael Watson, Member of the First Quorum of the Seventy, Sister Rosemary M. Wixom General President of Primary in General Conference, and Sister Linda K Burton, General President of the Latter-day Saints' Relief Society Organization made the presentation.


Sister Wixom said the resources they are providing are to assist the women and children of American Samoa in the fight against breast cancer.


“We are thankful that modern science provides for us a detector that saves lives… and my heart is so grateful for what the physicians do for the women and what you also do for the children,” she said.


The LDS Church's Primary organization serves approximately one million Latter-day Saint children in countries around the world. Primary, as described at the Mormon Newsroom website, "is designed to supplement the religious instruction given by parents. Children meet during Mormon worship services each Sunday to discuss Church doctrine, participate in learning activities and sing songs."


"Children of all ages have the opportunity to participate in these meetings by giving prayers, reading scriptures and giving talks on gospel subjects."


Sister Burton noted that this project is one of the many projects the church is involved with, such as wheelchair projects, water projects, helping hands projects and many other charity projects.


Referring to the name of their organization — the Relief Society— Sister Burton said that they try to bring relief — and their thoughts were on the relief of disease. She said that being a mother of five daughters, she has a special interest in this project.


The Relief Society was organized in the United States in 1842.  There are now an estimated six million women in local Relief Societies in every Latter-day Saint congregation worldwide. 


LBJ Board Chairperson, Sandra King Young noted that the LBJ board of directors is fairly new and to receive wonderful news at the beginning of their tenure that the LDS Church is donating life saving machines is very much welcome.


“We are faced with dwindling federal funds and with strains of the financial limits that the hospital has — we have a very tough job ahead of us,” King-Young said, and then quoted late LDS Church President Gordon B Hinckley — “The strength of our country comes from families and the virtue of our people.”


She noted that last week the board passed a motion to establish a Charitable Hospital Foundation for the hospital so they can raise funds to carry out their service to the people.


Acting Governor Lemanu on behalf of the government and the people of American Samoa thanked the LDS Church and the leaders for their generous donation.


He also extended thanks to the Church for the helping hands project that picks up trash every Flag Day and maintains the government’s cemetery in Satala.


The delegation departed American Samoa today en route to visiting Australia.


Comment Here