Predictions for the next 100 years of flying

NEW YORK (AP) — Millions of people step aboard airplanes each day, complaining about the lack of legroom and overhead space but almost taking for granted that they can travel thousands of miles in just a few hours.Wednesday marks the 100th anniversary of the first commercial flight: a 23-minute hop across Florida's Tampa Bay. The St. Petersburg-Tampa Airboat Line was subsidized by St. Petersburg officials who wanted more winter tourists in their city. The alternative: an 11-hour train ride from Tampa.Pilot Tony Jannus had room for just one passenger, who sat next to him in the open cockpit. Three months later - when tourism season ended - so did the subsidy. The airline had carried 1,204 passengers but would never fly again.With the anniversary in mind, The Associated Press reached out to today's aviation leaders to see what they are predicting for the future of flying. Answers have been edited for length and clarity.IN FIVE YEARS:- Richard Anderson, CEO Delta Air Lines: \Just over a decade ago airlines seemed to be buying every 50-seat aircraft they could get their hands on. But the real utility of those small jets has come and gone and in the next five years we'll see their numbers in the U.S. continue to dwindle.\- Gary Kelly, CEO Southwest Airlines: \We'll have fewer airlines

Comment Here