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VIDEO: Today's Headline News from Associated Press

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BILL TO LEGALIZE WEB POKER INTRODUCED IN CONGRESS
 
LAS VEGAS (AP) -- Gamblers who prefer their laptops to blackjack tables could be getting a boost from Washington.
 
Republican New York Congressman Peter King introduced legislation Thursday that would rescue online gambling from a legal gray zone and fully regulate it.
 
The federal government cracked down on online poker in 2011. But the same year, the Justice Department issued a ruling making online gambling legal so long as it's permitted on the state level.
 
As a result, states have taken steps to usher in a new era of online gambling. It already is legal in Nevada, New Jersey and Delaware.
 
King says his bill would allow states and players to navigate the world of online betting with confidence. The measure is called the Internet Gambling Regulation, Consumer Protection and Enforcement Act of 2013.
 
WHITE HOUSE: NSA PHONE RECORDS A 'CRITICAL TOOL'
 
ABOARD AIR FORCE ONE (AP) -- The White House says a court order allowing the government to secretly collect millions of U.S. citizens' telephone records is a critical tool to fight security threats.
 
White House spokesman Josh Earnest says he can't discuss classified information. But he says the court order in question allows the intelligence community to know when terrorists or suspected terrorists are engaging in dangerous activities. He says that's particularly true for people located in the U.S.
 
He says the order doesn't allow the government to listen in on calls, but only includes details like telephone numbers.
 
Earnest says there's a robust legal regime overseeing the program and that Congress has been fully briefed.
 
Disclosure of the phone records was first reported by The Guardian newspaper and confirmed by Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif.
 
FDA PANEL WANTS CHANGES TO AVANDIA SAFETY MEASURES
 
WASHINGTON (AP) -- Federal health experts recommend modifying safety restrictions on former blockbuster diabetes pill Avandia, in light of a new analysis suggesting that the drug may not increase the risk of heart attack as previously believed.
 
A majority of Food and Drug Administration advisers voted to change measures that currently limit patient access to GlaxoSmithKline's Avandia. Under current rules, patients must sign a waiver that they understand the drug's risks before getting a prescription. The panel's vote is a recommendation to the FDA and is not binding. Advisers will now discuss specific changes to the restrictions.
 
Avandia was once the best-selling diabetes drug in the world, but sales plummeted after heart attack concerns emerged in 2007. In 2010 the FDA limited access to the drug and European regulators banned the pill.

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