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On July 10, 1968, Brian Cruz Conboy was born at the LBJ Tropical Medical Center. Brian is being held by his mother Josephine who moved to the territory with her husband Roy and their children after Roy received a contract job to work as principal for Nua Elementary School in 1966. Brian returned to his birthplace two weeks ago, 49 years after he left. See story for full details.  [photo: courtesy]
For his 49th birthday, Brian Cruz Conboy knew exactly where he wanted to celebrate. On a tiny island in the South Pacific where he was born — American Samoa. Brian, a Palagi man whose parents relocated to the territory back in the 1960s, returned home to Long Beach, CA last Friday after visiting...
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14 TAKEN INTO POLICE CUSTODY OVER THE WEEKEND It was a busy weekend for police responding to calls for assistance. Fourteen people were taken into custody and held at the Territorial Correctional Facility over the weekend. They appeared yesterday morning for their initial appearances before...
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Some senators have suggested that the Education Department hire security guards to watch over public school facilities at night and over the weekend to prevent break-ins and damages to school property. The suggestion, along with recommendations to build fences around all public school campuses, was...
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An oversight hearing on “Assessing Current Conditions and Challenges at LBJ in American Samoa” will take place today in the nation's capital. Invited witnesses already in Washington DC to answer inquiries are: Thomas Bussanich Director of the Budget Office of Insular Affairs, Department of the...
Samoans living in the U.S. are less likely to have excellent or very good health compared to Guamanians or Chamorro persons and Native Hawaiians, according to some key findings in a health report released last Friday by the US Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The 99-page report on...
Texan aviator and pilot Brian Lloyd (middle) on the tarmac at the Pago Pago International Airport, with people who serviced his plane last Saturday night, upon arrival for a stopover in American Samoa, around 9 p.m. Lloyd is on an around-the-world solo flight to commemorate American female aviator, Amelia Earhart’s famous flight 80-years ago. Pictured with him (L-R) Jason Pritchard of Pritchard’s Airport Service — a local airport ground handling company — an airport police officer, and the PAS crew. [photo:
American Samoa was the stopover point, for rest and refueling, for Texas pilot Brian Lloyd who is flying solo on his single engine plane around the world, to commemorate American female aviator Amelia Earhart’s famous flight 80-years ago. “My plan is to take with me some flowers or flower leis to...
Gov. Lolo Matalasi Moliga [SN file photo]
Establishing a new one-percent Alternative Minimum Business Tax (AMBT) will ensure that businesses pay their share of taxes and not avoid them through creative accounting and loopholes, said Gov. Lolo Matalasi Moliga, who asked the Fono for approval of the proposed AMBT bill, “requiring businesses...
Congresswoman Aumua Amata  [SN file photo]
AMATA AND HVAC MARK-UP LANDMARK G.I. BILL Washington, D.C. — Friday, July 21, 2017 — Congresswoman Aumua Amata, and the House Committee on Veterans’ Affairs passed a series of bills out of mark-up yesterday including H.R. 3218, The Harry W. Colmery Veterans Educational Assistance Act of 2017. H.R....
Commerce Department director Keniseli Lafaele [SN file photo]
With the Fono being the lawmaking body of the territorial government, Commerce Department director Keniseli Lafaele told a Senate Committee that it's up to the Legislature if they want to establish a law that would protect certain industries, specifically for local American Samoans — only. Lafaele...
One of the 20 people, so far, who has agreed to get inked and take part in an ongoing study that could possibly prove a link between tattoos and a robust immune system. Pictured is an arm sleeve by Off Da Rock owner Joseph Ioane. See story for full details.  [photo: courtesy]
So far, 20 people have decided to get tattooed — a first for some of them — as part of an ongoing research that aims to show the link between ink work and a robust immune system. "It's been going well," said Dr. Michaela Howells, an Assistant Professor of Anthropology at the University of North...

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