Samoan breadfruit to help alleviate hunger around the world

Various breadfruit species from Samoa will be researched and reproduced in the United States to counter hunger around the world.
Prime Minister Tuilaepa Lupesoliai Sailele Malielegaoi and the Minister for Agriculture and Fisheries La’aulialemalietoa Leuatea Polataivao signed a memorandum of understanding to that effect with a group of American researchers last week.
The MOU says that Samoa will provide a variety of breadfruit and the Americans will pay royalties to Samoa.


Tuilaepa said Samoa has many varieties of breadfruit compared to other countries who may have only one or two.
“These breadfruits will be replanted or reproduced in America then distributed to countries in Africa,” Tuilaepa said.
La’auli believes that Samoa is not the only country that would benefit from this undertaking.
Besides breadfruit, America has markets for other Samoan produce such as taro, yams and manioka.
La’auli also spoke about the recent opportunity to export frozen breadfruit to Australia after negotiations with the Australian government.
He said once they realized the opportunity, he and his delegation returned to Samoa, talked with farmers, and the end result was a container of frozen breadfruit currently being prepared for Australia. It will leave Samoa at the end of the month.

Breadfruits are being bought from farmers in Fasito’o, Toamua, Aleisa and the Ministry is in the process of preparing the container.


Breadfruit flour also is in demand


There is also an interest in the Samoan flour made from breadfruit.
La’auli said a special oven to produce flour from breadfruit will arrive in November.
“We have already consulted with manufacturers to buy the Samoan made flour,” he said.
The manufacturers are the same people that have offered to provide the oven, and although that Samoa offers the biggest variety of breadfruits, the manufacturers have specifically asked for the ma’afala specie which is considered of the best quality.
Samoan breadfruit is currently banned from entering New Zealand due to fears of the fruit fly entering that market.


Read more at The Guam Daily Post

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