Update: Silicon Valley 7s

United World Sports must be congratulated for hosting the Silicon Valley 7s, an event that develops our Pacific Island athletes in the heat of international rugby 7s competition. See standing, stats and match recaps of the Silicon Valley Sevens at the end of this story.

 

National Sevens Rugby teams from the United States, Canada, Tonga, Samoa, Fiji, New Zealand, Japan, Australia, China, England, Ireland and Chile were featured.  After interviews with several teams, all expressed they are keen to provide competitive exposure for their rising talent.

Village provincial teams are a good springboard for our islands.  The crowd, the beautiful Avaya Stadium, the other nations’ talent will require significantly greater focus and commitment to our boys’ game skill set.  It is inappropriate to try to nurture players in the battle for the World Rugby HSBC World Championship... especially with added pressure of the upcoming 2018 World Rugby 7s World Cup (being held in adjacent big city, San Francisco).

Next week American Samoa’s  Talavalu will battle for a return to the Hong Kong 7s at the 2017 Oceania 7s (Suva, Fiji). Should Talavalu have been here to sharpen their form, or would the Silicone Valley 7s been an obstacle to Talavalu’s big picture development objectives? I trust that the American Samoa Rugby Union leadership knows what’s best for the Territory’s national team in determining their participation (if invited and the obvious reality, was it in the budget).

Go online, pick up the phone to encourage your US Mainland family and friends to support this great debut 7s event.

While United World Sports also hosts The USA HSBC Las Vegas 7s... this might be an alternative or additional event for those big Poly family gatherings we always plan around international rugby.

United World Sports staff could not give Cool Stuff an official expectation for the future evolution of the Silicon Valley 7s... probably because this debut may be testing the waters to determine that direction.

Keeping this event as an international development tourney or attempting to raise it to another official stop on the HSBC World 7s tour is all good. We get player growth, great spectator rugby in new geographic USA markets, and a family friendly international sports interactive festival and concert.

The music happenings features Fiji , Spawnbreezie, WriteMinded and ValuFa, with BigBody Cisco serving as the official Master of Ceremonies.

Gates open 10 am Saturday 11/4, 9am Sunday 11/5.  The Guinness Beer is on you... Cool Stuff will be there at 8am.  We will of course try to get a photo of you from our little spot on the field.  

Just hold up your latest copy of the Samoa News or show us the Samoa News website on your phone so we can find you! 

GENERAL INFO

Day 2 Match Schedule

11:00 AM Bowl Semifinal #1: Ireland 38–5 China (M19)

11:22 AM Bowl Semifinal #2: Canada 41–0 Tonga (M20)

*20-Minute Break*

12:04 PM Quarterfinal #1: Australia 40–7 New Zealand (M21)

12:26 PM Quarterfinal #2: USA 24–5 Fiji (M22)

12:48 PM Quarterfinal #3: Samoa 10–25 England (M23)

01:10 PM Quarterfinal #4: Chile 24–10 Japan (M24)

*51-Minute Break*

02:23 PM 11th-Place Match: China 34–5 Tonga (M25)

02:45 PM Bowl Final: Ireland 19–12 Canada (M26)

*Bowl Presentation? (3 minutes extra gap)*

03:10 PM 5th-Place Semi #1: New Zealand 15–26 Fiji  (M27)

03:32 PM 5th-Place Semi #2: Samoa 27–12 Japan (M28)

03:54 PM Cup Semifinal #1: Australia 27–0 Chile (M29)

04:16 PM Cup Semifinal #2:  USA 27–0 England  (M30)

*1:17 Break*

05:55 PM 7th-Place Match: New Zealand 26–5 Japan (M31)

06:17 PM 5th-Place Match: Fiji 14–26 Samoa (M32)

06:39 PM 3rd-Place Match: Chile 12–31 England (M33)

07:04 PM Cup Final: Australia 15–12 USA (M34)

DREAM TEAM

  1. Maurice Longbottom – Australia
  2. Edwards Jenkins – Australia
  3. Banjamin De Vits – Chile
  4. Michael Shinomiya – Japan
  5. Ben Pinkleman – USA
  6. Folau Niua – USA
  7. Stephen Tomasin – USA

Standings:

1        Australia        9        +112

2        USA                9        +42

3        Samoa        8        +10

4        Chile                7        +38

5        Japan                6        +18

6        England        6        +12

7        Fiji                6        –9

8        NZ                5        +15

9        Ireland        5        –12

10        Canada        5        –10

11        Tonga                3        –95

12        China                3        –114

FINAL POOL STANDINGS

  • Pool A

TEAM        W        L        D        PF        PA        DIF        RNK PTS

Samoa        2        0        1        41        31        +10        8

England        1        1        1        50        38        +12        6

Ireland        1        2        0        29        41        -12        5

Canada        1        1        0        36        46        -10        5

*Ireland head-to-head tiebreaker

  • Pool B

TEAM        W        L        D        PF        PA        DIF        RNK PTS

Australia        3        0        0        112        7        +105        9

Japan        1        1        1        80        62        +18        6

Fiji                1        1        1        61        70        -9        6

China        0        3        0        15        129        -114        3

  • Pool C

TEAM        W        L        D        PF        PA        DIF        RNK PTS

USA                3        0        0        82        40        +42        9

Chile                3        0        0        67        29        +38        7

NZ                1        2        0        46        31        +15        5

Tonga        0        3        0        7        102        -95        3

TOURNAMENT STATS (After Day 1)

Top Try Scorers

  1. Stephen Tomasin (USA) – 5
  2. Yoshihiro Noguchi (JPN) – 4
  3. Banjamin De Vits (CHL) – 3
  4. Felipe Brangier (CHL) – 3
  5. Edward Jenkins (AUS) – 3
  6. Maurice Longbottom (AUS) – 3
  7. Benjamin O’Donnell (AUS) – 3
  8. Changchun Shan (CHN) – 3

Top Goal Scorers

  1. Michael Shinomiya (JPN) – 10
  2. Nocenieli Batine (FIJ) – 8
  3. Thomas Lucas (AUS) – 8
  4. Will Edwards (ENG) – 5
  5. Folau Niua (USA) – 
  6. Patrick Faapale (SAM) – 3
  7. Lewis Holland (AUS) – 3
  8. Pat Kay (CAN) – 3
  9. Liters Laulala (NZL) – 3
  10. Marcelo Torrealba (CHL) – 3

Top Points Scorers

  1. Michael Shinomiya (JPN) – 30
  2. Nocenieli Batine (FIJ) – 26
  3. Stephen Tomasin (USA) – 25
  4. Thomas Lucas (AUS) – 21
  5. Yoshihiro Noguchi (JPN) – 20
  6. Felipe Brangier (CHL) – 17
  7. Lewis Holland (AUS) – 16
  8. Will Edwards (ENG) – 15
  9. Edward Jenkins (AUS) – 15
  10. Maurice Longbottom (AUS) – 15
  11. Benjamin O’Donnell (AUS) – 15
  12. Changchun Shan (CHN) – 15

TOP SCORERS AFTER DAY 2

Day 2 Match Details

11:00 AM Bowl Semifinal #1: Ireland v. China (M19)

Details:

Ireland started on the right foot with a quick strike by John O’Donnell for the 5–0 lead. An interception by Will Connors led to a Jordan Conroy try to extend the lead to 10–0. An interception on the restart sent O’Donnell in for his second score of the match. Billy Dardis added the conversion, making it 17–0, a quarter of the way into the match. Following the restart, China’s Chong Ma looked to have something going with a kick ahead, but Dardis thwarted the opportunity. Following consistent pressure, Ma found space in the right corner. He was unable to convert his try, leaving it 17–5 at the break.

A well-earned team try saw Ireland extend the lead in the first minute of the second half. Dardis found room up the middle for a try under the post. He easily added the two-point capper to his score, making it 24–5. A try by Harry McNulty off a pass from John O’Donnell extended the lead to 31–5 following the Tim Schmidt conversion. Shane Daly soon joined the scoring effort to make it 38–5, with Schmidt again adding the conversion, where it stood at the end of the match.

Ireland advances to the bowl final, and China will face the loser of Canada-Tonga to try and clinch its first win of the tournament.

Stats:

Ireland:

Tries

John O’Donnell (#1) – Try #1, Try #3

Jordan Conroy (#11) – Try #2

Billy Dardis (#4) – Try #4

Harry McNulty (#5) – Try #5

Shane Daly (#3) – Try #6

Goals

Billy Dardis (#4) – 2/4

Tim Schmidt (#8) – 2/2

China:

Tries

Chong Ma (#12) – Try #1

Goals

Chong Ma (#12) – 0/1

11:22 AM Bowl Semifinal #2: Canada v. Tonga (M20)

Details:

Canada was first on the board with a try by Admir Cejvanovic. The conversion did not have the distance, leaving it 5–0 early in the match. Two minutes later, Jared Douglas streaked up the middle for a try under the posts. Pat Kay added the conversion, giving Canada a 12–0 lead. A third Canadian try coming by way of Josiah Morra pushed the advantage to 17. Despite some late pressure from Tonga, it was Canada who scored to end the first half with a try in the corner by Luke Bradley and a long distance conversion from Pat Kay.

Kay built on his points haul with a converted try under the sticks. Tonga’s Ofa Pongi received a yellow card in his attempted tackle ahead of the Kay try. Canada soon made it six-on-six with a yellow card to Josiah Morra for tossing the ball away following a Canada penalty. Moments later, Tonga looked set to score with Viliami Soakai running free under the post, but a penalty brought the ball back with Canada still in front 31–0.

The next points went the way of Canada with a try in the left corner for Pat Kay. His conversion attempt had the direction but failed to have the distance. An Isaac Kaay try, Canada’s seventh of the match, pushed the Canadians ahead to a final 41–0. The win sent Canada to face Ireland for the Bowl.

Stats:

Canada:

Tries

Admir Cejvanovic (#2) – Try #1

Jared Douglas (#8) – Try #2

Josiah Morra (#7) – Try #3

Luke Bradley (#3) – Try #4

Pat Kay (#10) – Try #5, Try #6

Isaac Kaay (#6) – Try #7

Goals

Pat Kay (#10) – 3/7

Tonga:

Tries

Goals

12:04 PM Quarterfinal #1: Australia v. New Zealand (M21)

Details:

Australia’s Edward Jenkins was the first to find pay dirt in the match with a try in the left corner. Thomas Lucas could not cap the try with the extra points, leaving it a 5–0 margin for the Australians. Lachlan Anderson soon capitalized on an All Blacks Sevens’ penalty for a converted try under the post. Lucas added the simple conversion. Jesse Houston’s try, converted by Luteru Laulala cut the deficit to five. A converted try from Simon Kennewell put Australia back in front by seven, with Lewis Holland hitting the two-pointer to end the half.

Staunch defense prevented a quick try by New Zealand, forcing a penalty on the Australia five-meter line. Lewis Holland’s kick to touch did not find much space, leaving a difficult lineout, which was stolen by New Zealand, but Australia managed to force a turnover not long after. Moments later, Edward Jenkins broke free for a try under the goal posts. Holland much appreciated the easy conversion opportunity, and added the conversion for a 26–7 lead with a quarter of the match left to play. Any doubt as to the outcome ws put to rest when Lachlan Anderson added his second try. Lucas added the two points to make it 33–7 in the thirteenth minute. To close the match, John Porch broke free to put the icing on Australia’s cake. Lucas hit the tough conversion to make it 40–7.

Stats:

Australia:

Tries

Edward Jenkins (#9) – Try #1, Try #4

Lachlan Anderson (#12) – Try #2, Try #5

Simon Kennewell (#2) – Try #3

John Porch (#6) – Try #6

Goals

Thomas Lucas (#10) – 3/4

Lewis Holland (#4) – 2/2

New Zealand:

Tries

Jesse Houston (#1) – Try #1

Goals

Luteru Laulala (#7) – 1/1

12:26 PM Quarterfinal #2: USA v. Fiji (M22)

Details:

Team USA entered in rare territory as a strong favorite over Fiji. The Eagles got the first points thanks to an explosive run by Kevon Williams on the left wing from a perfect pass by Folau Niua. Niua’s conversion attempt had the right angle, but fell just short. A sloppy restart ended up with the Americans and led to a chip through for Folau Niua, scooped up by Martin Iosefo for the try under the post. Niua added the easy conversion to go in front 12–0. A yellow card to Nocenieli Batine left Fiji down a man for the remainder of the half. With the man advantage, the Eagles built on the lead thanks to a try from Joe Schroeder. Niua could not get the long-distance kick to convert, making it 17–0 with just enough time for a restart. Netani Vakyalia took the kick and exploded down the touchline for the score in the left corner. With his yellow card expired, Batine returned to attempt the conversion, but failed to further cut into the lead.

At the start of the second half, the Eagles held a 17–5 advantage. After a tough restart, remarkably well-taken by Stephen Tomasin, the Eagles worked methodically down the pitch, leading to a try from Martin Iosefo in the left corner, to complete his brace. This time, Niua was able to nail the difficult conversion for a 24–5 lead. After some back-and-forth play the rest of the half, the Eagles held on to win 24–5 and advance to the semifinal.

Stats:

USA:

Tries

Kevon Williams (#11) – Try #1

Martin Iosefo (#12) – Try #2, Try #4

Joe Schroeder (#3) – Try #3

Goals

Folau Niua (#7) – 2/4

Fiji:

Tries

Netani Vakyalia (#11) – Try #1

Goals

Nocenieli Batine (#10) – 0/1

12:48 PM Quarterfinal #3: Samoa v. England (M23)

Details:

The first two tries went to team England, with Ryan Olowofela blistering by Samoa for the first score and Will Muir dotting down the second. Neither conversion went over for Will Edwards, making it a 10–0 lead for England. As few would have expected coming into the tournament, an England win in this Match would mean an upset. Fergus Guiry’s try in the thirteenth minute made it a three-score lead just ahead of the half. Edwards’s conversion attempt struck the post and failed. Ethan Waddleton was barely denied a try, but Harry Glover finished the movement. Edwards hooked the kick from a friendly angle, leaving it 20–0 at the break.

Fergus Guiry got the second-half scoring started for England with a try on the far left side of the posts. Edwards fifth shot at goal left him still with a goose egg in the success column, but his team’s twenty-five point lead was a sound enough buffer to absorb the struggle. Jacob Ale soon cut into the lead with Samoa’s first try, but Samoa Toloa could not add the conversion, keeping the margin where it was at intermission, but with only a few minutes remaining in the match. With only two minutes remaining, Malu Falaniko got Samoa a second try on the board, but Murphy Penetitio could not get the conversion, leaving it a three-score match. Samoa almost scored a consolation score to end the match, but Joe Perez stepped into touch.

Stats:

Samoa:

Tries

Jacob Ale (#1) – Try #1

Malu Falaniko (#2) – Try #2

Goals

Samoa Toloa (#10) – 0/1

Murphy Penetito (#6) – 0/1

England:

Tries

Ryan Olowofela (#11) – Try #1

Will Muir (#3) – Try #2

Fergus Guiry (#6) – Try #3, Try #5

Harry Glover (#10) – Try #4

Goals

Will Edwards (#4) – 0/5

01:10 PM Quarterfinal #4: Chile v. Japan (M24)

Details:

The final semifinal of the day was not what many would have expected for the 4 vs 5 matchup. In a tournament filled with HSBC Sevens World Series core members, Japan, the most recently relegated side, entered as the underdog to a Chilean team that competed twice on the World Series last season, but has never been a core team.

 Chile struck first with a try by Banjamin De Vits. Marcelo Torrealba made it a full 7–0 lead with the conversion. Japan answered with an unconverted try by Naoki Motomura to cut the deficit to two. A steal by Torrealba sent him away for a try to the left of the post to end the half. With the conversion from Francisco Urroz, Chile led by nine at the break.

Pedro Pablo Verschae got Chile started in the second half with a try in the left corner, earned through a physical drive against the Japanese defense. Marcelo Torrealba failed on the conversion, making it 19–5 with under five minutes remaining. Taisei Hayashi’s try in the left corner gave Japan a chance. Michael Shinomiya’s long-conversion attempt struck off the front of the crossbar, leaving it a two-score game. A second try by Banjamin De Vits undid the damage from the Hayashi score, putting Chile back in front 24–10. Rodrigo Fernandez failed to add the conversion, but the restart coming with under ten seconds left, meant the result was secured. Chile 24, Japan 10.

Stats:

Chile:

Tries

Banjamin De Vits (#12) – Try #1, Try #4

Marcelo Torrealba (#4) – Try #2

Pedro Pablo Verschae (#2) – Try #3

Goals

Marcelo Torrealba (#4) – 1/2

Francisco Urroz (#10) – 1/1

Rodrigo Fernandez (#5) – 0/1

Japan:

Tries

Naoki Motomura (#12) – Try #1

Taisei Hayashi (#10) – Try #2

Goals

Michael Shinomiya (#8) – 0/2

02:23 PM 11th-Place Match: China v. Tonga (M25)

Details:

China looking for its first victory in the tournament was first to score, with a try from Yingli Fu in the right corner. Changshun Shan was unable to add the conversion. China gained a yellow card advantage after Sioeli Pouhila was sent off for Tonga. China capitalized with a try by Zhenye Hu. Again, Shan did not connect, leaving it 10–0. Tonga soon responded with a try from Viliami Soakai in the left corner. Lisiate Taione missed the conversion. Hu’s second try of the match made it 15–5 at the half.

A second try for Yingli Fu and a conversion by Chonga Ma put China in the driver’s seat with four minutes remaining in the match. Japan’s fifth try, this time a converted try by Changshun Shan, converted by Ma, put the match out of reach. But, for good measure, Ma added a try of his own in the final minute. He could not, however, add his own conversion, missing just right. China proved a great deal in that win. China 34, Tonga 5.

Stats:

China:

Tries

Yingli Fu (#10) – Try #1, Try #4

Zhenye Hu (#7) – Try #2,  Try #3

Changshun Shan (#5) – Try #5

Chonga Ma (#12) – Try #6

Goals

Changshun Shan (#5) – 0/2

Wenru Feng (#4) – 0//1

Chonga Ma (#12) – 2/3

Tonga:

Tries

Viliami Soakai (#12) – Try #1

Goals

Lisiate Taione (#4) – 0/1

02:45 PM Bowl Final: Ireland v. Canada (M26)

Details:

Ireland threatened early, but Canada struck first with an unconverted try for Liam Underwood. A try for Terry Kennedy tied things up at five. The Ian Fitzpatrick try right after along with the Billy Dardis conversion put Ireland on top by seven. Underwood’s second try on the stroke of halftime gave Canada a chance to pull even at the half, and Pat Kay did just that with a kick from distance.

Early in the second half, Canada almost took the lead with what would have been a try by Phil Berna, but Berna was unable to touch the ball down prior to step beyond the dead-ball line. Instead, it was Terry Kennedy adding his second try of the match that broke the tie. Billy Dardis’s conversion pushed the lead to a full score.  With the clock falling under two minutes reamining, Ireland worked into the Canada twenty-two, looking to put the match away. But Canada won a penalty with 1:33 left to keep the prospect of extra time allowed. Canada applied a pressure and Ireland bent, but refused to break. With the end in sight, Ireland won a penalty and booted to touch to end the match and claim the bowl.

Stats:

Ireland:

Tries

Terry Kennedy (#10) – Try #1, Try #3

Ian Fitzpatrick (#2) – Try #2

Goals

Billy Dardis (#4) – 2/3

Canada:

Tries

Liam Underwood (#9) – Try #1, Try #2

Goals

Pat Kay (#10) – 1/2

03:10 PM 5th-Place Semi #1: New Zealand  v. Fiji (M27)

Details:

A match much earlier in the day than many might have expected. But with fifth-place still on offer, and pride always at stake in a matchup between Fiji and New Zealand, the two teams were sure to battle hard. New Zealad opened with an early 10–0 lead from tries by Whira Meltzer and Jordan Hyland. But Josua Vakruinabili combined with a Aminoni Nasilasila conversion made things interesting. Jordan Hyland’s second try made it a two-score lead once again, but the miss of the easy conversion by Levi Harmon left it a mere eight-point lead. Fiji threatened to score to end the half, but the All Blacks were able to fend off the charge.

A try by Nasilasila along with his conversion brought Fiji within one with five minutes remaining. Jasa Veremmalua’s try in the 11th minute put Fiji in front. Nasilasila’s third conversion of the match left New Zealand needing a converted try to avoid yet another loss. With the crowd unquestionably partisan for the Fijians, the All Blacks attempted to come out on top, but it was not to be as Jasa Veremalua crossed in the left corner for a second try to end the match.

Stats:

New Zealand:

Tries

Whira Metlzer (#6) – Try #1

Jordan Hyland (#3) – Try #2, Try #3

Goals

Whira Meltzer (#6) – 0/1

Levi Harmon (#12) 0/2

Fiji:

Tries

Josua Vakurinabili (#2) – Try #1

Aminoni Nasilasila (#12) – Try #2

Jasa Veremalua (#1) – Try #3, Try #4

Goals

Aminoni Nasilasila (#12) – 3/3

Nocenieli Batine (#10) – 0/1

03:32 PM 5th-Place Semi #2: Samoa v. Japan (M28)

Details:

With Fiji awaiting the winner and New Zealand the loser, a tough road ahead remained for either team. But both Japan and Samoa entered this fifth-place semifinal match with a strong showing on Day 1 that just did not carry over into the first match on Day 2.

In the third minute, Japan’s Jose Seru pounded over the line near the posts. Michael Shinomiya added to his tournament-leading conversion haul, making it 7–0. Seru’s match was soon ended, however, with a red card for a dangerous, high tackle. Planning up a man, Samoa soon scored its first try through Murphy Penetito, but Tomasi Alosio could not tack on the two points needed to level the score. Alosio made up for the miss with a try in the left corner to end the half with the lead. Alosio also added the difficult conversion for good measure.

Playing down a man to a talented opponent was just too tall a task to ask of Japan. In the second half, Samoa opened the margin to ten with an unconverted try by Somoa Toloa. It took several minutes, but the next try was for Samoa, this one by Joe Perez. With the conversion missed, Samoa was well out of reach at 22–7 with under a minute to play. With the clock approaching zero, Darren Moore made it five tries for the Samoans. Japan played bravely at the end to try and add a consolation score, which Japan accomplished through Tevita Tsupou. Samoa 27, Japan 12.

Stats:

Samoa:

Tries

Murphy Penetito (#6) – Try #1

Tomasi Alosio (#8) – Try #2

Somoa Toloa (#10) – Try #3

Joe Perez (#11) – Try #4

Darren Moore (#3) – Try #5

Goals

Tomasi Alosio (#8) – 1/2

Murphy Penetito (#6) – 0/1

Malu Falniko (#2) – 0/2

Japan:

Tries

Jose Seru (#3) – Try #1

Tevita Tsupou (#5) – Try #2

Goals

Michael Shinomiya (#8) – 1/1

Yoshihiro Noguchi (#11) – 0/1

03:54 PM Cup Semifinal #1: Australia v. Chile (M29)

Details:

In the first semifinal, Chile looked to be the first team to blemish the Australian record. But Australia started with an early lead thanks to a try from Samuel Myers and excellent conversion by Lewis Holland. Chile came close to adding a score of its own, but a pass from Rodrigo Fernandez failed to find the unmarked Julio Blanc on the wing. From there it wasn’t long before Maurice Longbottom tore down the right wing for a try to build a cushion at 12–0.

A second Longbottom try to start the second half put Chile in a deep hole at 17–0. Another unconverted Australian score through Boyd Killingowrth extended the margin to 22–0. Then Longbottom completed his hat trick to make it 27–0 on full time.

Stats:

Australia:

Tries

Samuel Myers (#3) – Try #1

Maurice Longbottom (#11) – Try #2, Try #3, Try #5

Boyd Killingworth (#8) – Try #4

Goals

Lewis Holland (#4) – 1/3

Maurice Longbottom (#11) – 0/1

John Porch (#6) – 0/1

Chile:

Tries

Goals

04:16 PM Cup Semifinal #2:  USA v. England (M30)

Details:

England looked destined to score with a break through run, but Ben Pinkleman managed a textbook shoe tap tackle, then got the Eagles on the board first with a try in the left corner after a cracking run following a pass from Stephen Tomasin. Folau Niua could not drive the kick through, but three minutes into the semifinal, the Eagles were in front 5–0. Martin Iosefo was hit hard on the restart but won a penalty for the Americans in the process.

Matai Leuta had a line for the goal, but opted to pass inside instead of backing himself, leading to a knock and an England scrum. Despite being backed up, England was soon to midfield thanks to a penalty and long kick to touch. But the Eagles forced a turnover, only to surrender possession when an attacking phase saw a pass out to Leuta too far in front. Leuta soon got his team back in good shape with an excellent pass through the defense, leading ultimately to Ben Pinkleman’s second try of the match. Niua’s conversion attempt was a tad to the left, keeping it 10–0 with just enough time for the restart.

Leuta stole the restart, and Folau Niua stabbed a kick ahead for the hard-charging Martin Iosefo for the try in the corner and a 15–0 lead at the half.

In the second half, it was a Chris Mattina try and Stephen Tomasin conversion that saw the United States forge ahead to a 22–0 lead. By the time Kevon Williams hammered the ball down for team USA’s fifth try, the England resolve had clearly been broken. And there it stood at full time. USA 27, England 0.

Stats:

USA:

Tries

Ben Pinkleman (#2) – Try #1, Try #2

Martin Iosefo (#12) – Try #3

Chris Mattina (#10) – Try #4

Kevon Williams (#11) – Try #5

Goals

Folau Niua (#7) – 0/3

Stephen Tomasin (#9) – 1/2

England:

Tries

Goals

05:55 PM 7th-Place Match: New Zealand v.Japan (M31)

Details:

New Zealand narrowly missed a try in the first minute when Chase Tiatia barely stepped into touch. Two first-half tries for New Zealand through Mason Emerson and Salesi Rayasi along with a conversion by Luteru Laulala built a 12–0 lead for New Zealand. Laulalal added a third try and another conversion to push ahead 17–0 at intermission.

Japan started the second half with the kickoff rolling into in-goal, giving New Zealand a free kick at midfield. From there, Mason Emerson soon worked himself free for his second try of the match. Laulala chipped the straight-forward goal for a 26–0 lead with five minutes to play.  In the twelfth minute, Naoki Motomura capped off a try for Japan, edging to 26–5 behind. But Japan failed to get any closer. At full time: New Zealand 26, Japan 5.

Stats:

New Zealand:

Tries

Mason Emerson (#11) – Try #1, Try #4

Salesi Rayasi (#4) – Try #2

Luteru Laulalal (#7) – Try #3

Goals

Luteru Laulala (#7)– 3/4

Japan:

Tries

Naoki Motomura (#12) – Try #1

Goals

Michael Shinomiya (#8) – 0/1

06:17 PM 5th-Place Match: Fiji v. Samoa (M32)

Details:

In a fierce battle of rivals, Samoa drew first blood with an unconverted try by Malu Falaniko. Samoa’s second try came from a quintessentially island-style series of play. Both Fiji and Samoa forced several turnovers in a matter of seconds, with Samoa through an interception from Matty Tuatagaloa finally giving Samoa the advantage. Following a penalty at the Fiji twenty-two, Samoa got its second score, this time from Samoa Toloa for a try in the right corner. Murphy Penetito edged through the conversion to end the half.

Down 12–0 to start the second half, Fiji had little doubt that it could come back and win. The vocal and numerous Fiji fans certainly agreed. But the several fans waving Samoan flags were equally confident that their team would come out on top. Jacob Ale’s try under the post in the ninth minute extended Samoa’s lead, as did the simple conversion for Penetito. With that score, the Samoan fans started to out cheer their Fijian counterparts. Alamanda Motuga’s try with three minutes remaining put to rest the doubt that Samoa would come away on top. Penetito added the two-pointer to end his day, with his side ahead 26–0 heading into the final two minutes of play.

With a win likely out of reach, Fiji made sure to avoid the shutout, with a try by Viliame Bololailai. The quick conversion by Netani Vakayalia showed that Fiji still wanted to fight for the victory. The Fijian resolve was tested following the restart when Samoa looked certain to score. But stiff defense was rewarded when Fiji added a consolation try and conversion each by Nocenieli Batine. But it was too little too late as Fiji fell 26–14 to Samoa.

Stats:

Fiji:

Tries

Viliame Bololailai (#5) – Try #1

Nocenieli Batine (#10) – Try #2

Goals

Netani Vakayalia (#11) – 1/1

Nocenieli Batine (#10) – 1/1

Samoa:

Tries

Malu Falaniko (#2) – Try #1

Samoa Toloa (#10) – Try #2

Jacob Ale (#1) – Try #3

Alamanda Motuga (#5) – Try #4

Goals

Murphy Penetito (#6) – 3/4

06:39 PM 3rd-Place Match: England v. Chile (M33)

Details:

Chile was first to find the try zone when Rodrigo Fernandez finished off an outstanding run by Felipe Brangier. England took the lead on a try, two minutes later, from George De Cothi, who skirted free for a try under the post. Will Edwards added the conversion to take the lead. Chile tried to answer back with a kick through the English defense, but Fernandez could not collect the ball. England turned it the other direction, coming up just shy but winning a penalty in the process against Ignacio Silva. Fin Dewar was the beneficiary of the man advantage, adding a score in the right corner. Will Edwards could not connect on the conversion. England narrowly missed a third try off the restart, but a knock on ended the half.

Starting the half already down a man, Chile added a second to the sin bin when Brangier took the England player out in the air on the restart. Playing seven-on-five, England’s Will Edwards danced through the sparse defense, for England’s third try. He did not add the conversion, and Silva returned from his yellow card for the restart, but Brangier remained in the bin. Harry Glover’s try, giving England four, finally burned Brangier’s yellow card. But with Edwards’s conversion, Chile was behind 24–5.

Back to full strength, Chile looked every bit England’s equal. In the thirteenth minute, Nicolas Garafulic scored under the post, which combined with Francisco Urroz’s conversion, made it 24–12. There was enough time for a come back, but just. But England did not let the match slip away, instead seeing De Cothi complete a brace and Edwards add a third conversion. As the clock struck zero, England continued to fight for points, but none were on offer.

Although Chile failed to come away winners, nothing by great things can be said of Chile in this tournament. The future is bright and Chile should be expected to be a team to watch in San Francisco

Stats:

England:

Tries

George De Cothi (#5) – Try #1, Try #5

Fin Dewar (#8) – Try #2

Will Edwards (#4) – Try #3

Harry Glover (#10) – Try #4

Goals

Will Edwards (#4) – 3/5

Chile:

Tries

Rodrigo Fernandez (#5) – Try #1

Nicolas Garafulic (#8) – Try #2

Goals

Marcelo Torrealba (#4) – 0/1

Francisco Urroz (#10) – 1/1

07:04 PM Cup Final: Australia v. USA (M34)

Details:

Two intense days of champagne rugby culminate in a highly anticipated cup final between team USA and Australia. For team USA, this was the biggest stage since falling to Canada in the final of the 2017 Singapore Sevens. A win would be the biggest victory for the Eagles since defeating Australia in the 215 Lond Sevens final to claim a first, and only, World Series cup title.

Big victories demand big moments, and the Eagles delivered them in the first half. Virtuoso solo efforts in defense to take down Australian runners that looked destined to score, and leading ultimately to team USA scoring first, with a try by Ben Pinkleman after four minutes of play. Folau Niua’s kick hammered off the post, keeping Australia a mere converted try away from the lead.

Despite not winning the restart, the Eagles soon had possession again with a penalty at centerfield, setting up an attack in the final minute of the half. Niua took the slow tap and passed out to Stephen Tomasin who cut through the Australian defense like a hot knife through butter. Niua, despite facing a much tougher distance, added the conversion for a 12–0 lead with just enough time for a final restart of the half. Australia was the benefactor of the time with a try from Edward Jenkins to cut the lead to seven heading to halftime.

With only a converted try separating them, the inaugural Silicon Valley Sevens crown was still within reach of each squad. Australia, appearing to win possession by a clear infraction of playing the ball on the ground, cut into the lead with Edward Jenkins’s second try. Lewis Holland missed the conversion, to keep the Eagles ahead by two.

The restart failed to go ten meters, leading to a free kick for the United States. Kevon Williams just barely came up short, attempting to build on an offload from Maka Unufe, but Williams was pushed to touch at the Australian five-meter. Entering the final two minutes, Australia’s Maurice Longbottom broke free for a ninety-five meter try. John Porch missed the conversion, leaving team USA three points back with half a minute to go. As time expired, Australia forced a turnover in a contested ruck, then kicked to touch to come away with the title. Australia 15, USA 12.

Stats:

Australia:

Tries

Edward Jenkins (#9) – Try #1, Try #2

Maurice Longbottom (#11) – Try #3

Goals

Lewis Holland (#4) – 0/2

John Porch (#6) – 0/1

USA:

Tries

Ben Pinkleman (#2) – Try #1

Stephen Tomasin (#9) – Try #2

Goals

Folau Niua (#7) – 1/2

DAY 1 MATCHES

MATCHES

11:00 AM – Japan v. China (Pool B):

Match Recap

Japan took the opening kick and struck first with a try under the post. Following the simple conversion, China was able to recover the kick, and began to pressure, but Japan remained strong in defense. After forcing a knock and winning the resulting scrum, Japan continued to show why it has been the class of Asian rugby with another try, this one from Yoshihiro Noguchi. Michael Shinomiya again added the easy conversion for a 14–0 lead. Japan extended that lead with a second try from Noguchi following a big run from Lote Tuqiri. A third conversion made it 21–0 into the 7th minute. Japan threatened to add a fourth try with a steal on the touch line inside the China twenty-two, but a turnover lead to an error at a Japan line-out throw and a Chinese scrum. China attempted to press on the wing, but surrendered a penalty at its own twenty-two. Japan kicked for a line out just ten meters shy of the line. As Japan had all match, it showed methodical play and better discipline, leading to a try for Shinomiya just to the right of the post to close the half. Shinomiya’s conversion kept him perfect for the half with the boot.

Japan opted for a deep kick to put China back. Again trying to find some good fortune on the wing, China worked to midfield, but Japan forced a penalty, which led to a kick and chase, giving Japan its fifth try of the match, this one coming from Kameli Soejima. Shinomiya extending his perfect kicking mark to five. An inspired run for China’s Changshun Shan looked to have China headed in the right direction, but another error gave Japan a scrum at the ten-meter. A pick and go shortly thereafter gave Noguchi a hat trick, with Shinomiya out to six for six on conversions. Japan added an unconverted try from Soejima, giving him a brace, but Noguchi was unable to connect on the conversion. A final error from China, who struggled to break into the Japanese half ended the match. Japan 47, China 0.

STATS:

Japan

Tries

Taipei Hayashi (#10) - Try #1

Yoshihiro Noguchi (#11) - Try #2, Try #3, Try #6

Michael Shinomiya (#8) - Try #4

Kameli Soejima (#7) - Try #5 Try #7

Goals

Michael Shinomiya (#8) - 6/6

Noguchi (#11) - 0/1

China

Tries

Goals

11:22 AM – Fiji v. Australia (Pool B):

Match Recap

In one of the biggest matches on Day 1, Australia kicked off to the defending Olympic gold medalists, Fiji. Australia quickly got possession and hit pay dirt with a try in the right corner from speedster Lucas Thomas. Thomas failed on the conversion, leaving the match a mere five points between the two talented sides, two minutes into the match. After Fiji surged with the possession following the kick, Australia won a masterful penalty at midfield to regain the ball. Australia failed to do much with possession before giving the ball back to Fiji with a penalty.

In a classic moment of Fijian free flowing rugby, Leo Naikasau found space before passing to Nocenieli Batine, who passed back to Naikasau, then to Anare Tevita, but Australia stood tall. After strong pressure against the goal line, Australia forced a turnover and struck down the left wing from John Porch. Thomas was just off on the conversion, leaving it 10–0.

Australia stole the kickoff, giving the Aussies a chance at a third try to end the half. Australia looked to almost have it through Samuel Myers on the wing, but he was dragged just into touch.

Fiji managed to steal the kickoff, but the slap back cost a lot of territory. It looked like it may be no problem, with a chip over, but Fiji failed to bring the ball to hand, instead kicking ahead three times, eventually bounding through in-goal. The masterful dropout from Australia rolled into touch thirty meters from Fiji’s try line. Fiji won the line out but an errant pass immediately gave a line out to Australia. Australia won the line out but soon gave the ball back to Fiji, with sloppy play forcing exchanges in rapid succession. Ultimately, Australia was awarded a scrum, and used it to pressure Fiji into kicking the ball dead in goal, giving Australia a five-meter attacking scrum.  

Backed up in defense, a brutal high tackle, saw Fiji earn a red card, to play down a man the rest of the match. Australia soon opened the flood gates, adding three scores in rapid succession to end the match with a dominant shutout. Australia 29, Fiji 0.

STATS:

Fiji

Tries

Goals

Australia

Tries

Lucas Thomas (#10) - Try #1

John Porch (#6) – Try #2

Benjamin O’Donnell (#5) – Try #3, Try #5

Holland (#4) – Try #4

Goals

Lucas Thomas (#10) - 0/2

L ewis Holland (#4) 2/3

Fiji red to #12 Aminoni Nasilasila

11:44 AM – England v. Canada (Pool A):

Match Recap

Two of the hottest teams in sevens rugby took the pitch in only the third match of the already exciting day. The two teams were evenly matched for the first several minutes, before a strong run by Jared Douglas got Canada inside England’s twenty-two, eventually resulting in a John Moonlight try in the left corner that took a gymnastic effort to dot down before going to touch. Pat Kay failed on the conversion attempt from the left touch line. England responded with a try from Ryan Olowfela in the left corner. England failed on the conversion. To end the half, Canada’s Isaac Kaay powered over the line for the lead. Pat Kay connected on the conversion for the full seven-point lead for Canada to start the second half.

England held possession for the first minute of the second half, but conceded a penalty to Canada and a resulting yellow card, to Harry Glover, leaving England down a player at a crucial point in the game. Despite the man deficit, England refused to give space in defense. An inspired effort by Matt Mullins to hammer through the English defense was left without points when Luke Bradley was unable to get the edge on the right wing. England forced a knock on and won the defensive five-meter scrum. A hard charge was for not, when Canada forced a midfield turnover that would have turned into points had the rested Glover not succeeded in booting the ball into touch.

The great defensive effort of Glover only temporarily saved England. Matt Mullins soon added Canada’s third try. Kay’s conversion, left England needing two converted tries in the final ninety seconds to stave off defeat.As time expired, Canada held the ball. England managed to force a penalty and get a consolation try. The conversion hammered off the post, leaving the match a two-score victory for Canada (19–10).

STATS:

England

Tries

Ryan Olowofela (#11) – Try #1

Fin Dewar (#8) – Try #2

Goals

– 0/1

Canada

Tries

John Moonlight (#4) – Try #1

Isaac Kaay (#6) – Try #2

Matt Mullins (#1) – Try #3

Goals

Pat Kay (#10) – 2/3

12:06 PM – Samoa v. Ireland (Pool A):

Match Recap

Ireland looking to impress on the big stage, started quite well. With a cracking run from Ian Fitzpatrick. Samoa held in defense and was able to win a penalty to set up a line out inside the Ireland twenty-two. Although Samoa won the line out, Ireland’s defense forced Samoa back toward midfield. The Samoans eventually got back inside the Ireland twenty-two, but the Irish defense proved firm and forced a turnover. But the possession was not long, as a pass back to the Irish line was knocked on for a scrum right in front of the sticks. Sloppy play from Samoa deprived the side of points on the attack.

Ireland again stood strong in defense and finally worked into the Samoa half with a penalty kick setting up inside the Samoa ten-meter line. In a first half defined by errors, Samoa capitalized on an Ireland error to get the ball back and put pressure on the wing, winning a penalty inside the Ireland twenty-two. But again, Ireland held strong and won a penalty to regain the ball. But two passes later, the ball was knocked on in a pass to the wing, giving Samoa a scrum just inside the Irish ten-meter line. After seven minutes, the sides stood scoreless.

Ireland started the second half with an impressive steal. Having a bit of trouble keeping their footing on the wing but Bryan Mollen managed to dance through the Samoan defense for the first try of the match. Billy Dardis’s conversion attempt just off the post, left it anyone's match with five minutes remaining.

Samoa leveled it with a try by Jacob Ale on the left wing. But Murphy Pentito could not quite connect on the conversion, which would have given Samoa the lead. Inspired by the try, the Samoans hammered the Irish, eventually breaking in for a second unconverted try, this one by Joe Perez. But an error on the ensuing kickoff, gave Ireland a free kick at midfield, with 11 seconds remaining. But it was not enough, with Samoa holding on for the 10–5 victory.

STATS:

Samoa

Tries

Jacob Ale (#1) – Try #1

Joe Perez (#11) – Try #2

Goals

Murphy Pentito (#6) – 0/2

Ireland

Tries

Bryan Mollen (#12) – Try #1

Goals

Billy Dardis (#4)  – 0/1

12:28 PM – New Zealand v. Chile (Pool C):

Match Recap

With the rain beginning to fall heavily, the blue blood rugby powerhouse New Zealand All Blacks Sevens took the pitch to face upstart Chile. The Chileans impressed American fans last season with a showing of good sevens rugby in Vegas at the USA Sevens, although Chile struggled to add wins to skill.

Chile succeeded in stealing the open kickoff. Chile was the aggressor for the first two minutes of play. But failed to earn points in the early going. After finally winning possession, New Zealand looked set to enforce its will, but a fumble in a tackle at the New Zealand twenty-two, gave Chile another chance at getting on the board first. Chile managed to cross into in-goal, but the runner was dragged to touch.

Following the dropout, New Zealand finally managed possession and territory. Although New Zealand struggled to break a stiff Chilean line, the concession of two penalties, kept New Zealand attacking. But a great interception, gave Chile the ball back and winger Julio Blanc managed to switch the field. on New Zealand, with a run into the All Black twenty-two. Finally, Felipe Brangier got Chile on the board. Marcelo Torrealba added the tough conversion in the rain to make it a 7–0 lead over a nation that has held many others winless for decades at halftime.

New Zealand’s woes continued with a horrid kick directly into touch, giving Chile a free kick at midfield. Chile managed to hold possession until an ill-advised kick attempt, cost Chile possessions. A poor decision by Urroz Francisco led to a Chilean yellow card, forcing the underdogs to play down a man. Nevertheless, Chile won a penalty almost instantly, aiding in burning the clock. Instead of kicking to touch, Chile chose to tap the ball and try to attack from just inside its own half. A knock on at midfield, gave New Zealand a scrum feed with 3:40 left in the match.

Mason Emerson looked to be free for New Zealand’s first score, but just enough defense combined with a handling error, cost New Zealand the possession. Back to a full complement following a New Zealand penalty in the twelfth minute, gave Chile a lineout just inside the New Zealand half. The possession was soon lost with a knock on, giving the All Blacks a scrum with 2:10 remaining inside the Chilean half. Looking to close out the match on top, Chile brought in three subs. The Chileans stole the scrum and gave themselves a strong chance for the win, but New Zealand again forced a turnover with eighty seconds to play.

A high tackle penalty in the final minute saw New Zealand kick for touch just outside the Chilean twenty-two. With the time remaining, the decision was a certain concession of any chance at victory. New Zealand won the lineout and tried for the try in the right corner, but in the end, it was not to be. In a morning full of what might be described as upsets, Chile provided a truly memorable moment. Chile 7, New Zealand 0.

STATS:

New Zealand

Tries

Goals

Chile

Tries

Felipe Brangier (#1) – Try #1

Goals

Marcelo Torrealba (#4) – 1/1

12:50 PM – USA v. Tonga (Pool C):

Match Recap

Following the monster upset of Chile over New Zealand, the crowd was ecstatic to see its home team, the USA Eagles, take the pitch against Tonga. The Eagles applied pressure for the first minute of action before a handling error by Folau Niua at the Tonga twenty-two, gave aTonga a scrum.

Tonga missed a pass and Matai Leuta came up just short of making Tonga pay fully for the error. Leuta crossed the line but was held up in goal. The Tongans won the five-meter scrum, but the Eagles forced another scrum shortly thereafter. Although it was Tonga’s feed, the Tongans did so only six meters from its own line. Tonga managed to win the scrum and kick behind the American line. Folau Niua failed to take the kick cleanly, and the Tongan defense was quick in support. The American possession soon became Tonga’s ball with a handling error in the wet conditions.

The Eagles got the ball back and tried to kick to space, but Stephen Tomasin failed to come away with the ball. The next minute was back and forth until Viliami Soakai looked to be free for a score. But he ran out of gas just shy of the line, leading to a USA dropout. As both sides continued to struggle with the conditions, it was Tonga Who made the big plays and finally Viliami Soakai was able to get Tonga on the board with a try under the sticks. Persia Moimoi added the simple conversion.

Moimoi’s kickoff following the try rolled past the dead-ball line, giving the Eagles once more chance before the half. Tomasin made the most of it with a try from the right wing. Leaving himself with a tough conversion, Tomasin’s kick was off. At the half, it was Tonga 7, USA 5.

Off the restart, Martin Iosefo took the Folau Niua kick excellently, and moments later, Tomasin got his second try of the match. This time in the far left corner. Folau Niua stepped in for the conversion attempt from the touch line. The ball cracked off the right post and fell across the bar for the conversion and a five-point lead for team USA.

Starting to feel on solid footing, the Eagles again found themselves with ball in hand, and kept pressure on Tonga. A pass from Folau Niua sent Kevon Williams in for a try in the left corner to extend the lead. From slightly closer in, Niua’s kick failed to find its mark. Making it USA 17, Tonga 7 with three minutes remaining.

As is the hallmark of team USA when the team is succeeding, the Eagles won the kickoff with a great steal by Maka Unufe. A penalty inside Tonga’s twenty-two, gave the United States a chance at more points, and a behind the back pass by Ryan Matyas as he was being dragged to touch, just about provided them. With a steal from the ensuing lineout, Tomasin made it a hat trick. This time from just to the right of the posts, Niua’s kick found its goal.

The final restart came with thirty-two seconds remaining. Finally, Tonga was able to see some second-half possession. But the circling Eagle defense held strong until Folau Niua forced a remarkable turnover and Tomasin was free for a fourth try, after a setup pass by Kevon Williams to send him to the left corner. Niua could not add the conversion. But the 29–7 win, saw team USA finish the first round of play atop a tough Pool B.

STATS:

USA

Tries

Stephen Tomasin (#9) – Try #1, Try #2, Try #4, Try #5

Kevon Williams (#11) – Try #3

Goals

Stephen Tomasin (#9) – 0/1

Folau Niua (#7) – 2/4

Tonga

Tries

Viliami Soakai (#12) – Try #1

Goals

Peasipa Moimoi (#6) – 1/1

**BREAK**

02:38 PM – Fiji v. Japan (Pool B):

Match Recap

With the rain from earlier in the morning giving way to the famous California sunshine, Japan kicked to Fiji looking to build on an impressive start against China, that saw Japan start the second round of play as the top seed for quarterfinal contention. Japan could not have asked for a better start. A kick over the defense appeared to be destined for Fijian hands, but a handling error gave Japan’s Michael Shinomiya a try by the post. Shinomiya added his own conversion.

Not one to go down lightly, Fiji wasted little time responding with a quick score from Nocenieli Batine. Like Shinomiya’s score a short time before, Batine added his own conversion. A tough call on Josua Vakurinabili in the fifth minute gave Fiji a yellow card. Vakurinabili was called for a high tackle, but the Japanese ball carrier appeared to slide below the hit. The official, unfortunately for Fiji, was behind the tackler. From that vantage point, the call certainly appeared correct.

Up a man, Japan got back on top with a hard-fought try by Osukalloys Murata. Shinomiya struck the conversion well for the full score lead. The following kickoff failed to go ten meters, and Fiji took the free kick at midfield. An unpopular penalty, soon saw Japan with the ball back, but Fiji regained possession with the clock showing zeroes. A yellow card, this time for Japan’s Jose Seru, gave Fiji the opening it needed. That opening proved fruitful when Jasa Veremalua danced across the line for the score to end the half. Batine failed to add the two points that would have drawn the match level at the break.

In the second half, despite being down a man, Japan took  the offensive. With the pressure mounting, Fiji’s Manueli Ratuniyarawa showed Ill-discipline in an intentional knock on resulting in a yellow card. As Ratuniyarawa went off, Japan’s Seru came back on and almost instantly scored Japan’s third try of the match. Shinomiya made short work of the conversion to make the match 21–12. But Fiji refused to back down. A massive run from Batine set up a try forVakurinabili. Batine added the conversion, to put Fiji just two points behind. And a short while later, Batine would add Fiji’s fourth try and his third conversion to give Fiji the lead.

The resulting kickoff set up well for Fiji, as it was allowed to hit the deck and bounce to Netani Vakayalia, but a missed pass gave Japan one last chance at a famous victory. A gutsy Japan was game for the opportunity, charging into the Fiji twenty-two and winning a penalty. Japan hammered at the line, with Fiji stopping every pick and go as the ball inched closer and closer to midfield. A pass to Yoshihiro Noguchi looked to be destined for the game winner, but it was poorly taken, the ball came back on a penalty and Japan managed to get over in the right corner with the try from Naoki Motomura on the stroke of full time. Kameli Soejima was unable to hit the conversion, resulting in an impressive draw. Fiji 26, Japan 26.

STATS:

Fiji

Tries

Nocenieli Batine (#10) – Try #1 & Try #4

Jasa Veremalua (#1) – Try #2

Josua Vakurinabili (#2) – Try #3

Goals

        Nocenielie Batine (#10) – 3/4

Japan

Tries

Michael Shinomiya (#8) – Try #1

Osukalloyd Murata (#9) – Try #2

Jose Seru (#3) – Try #3

Naoki Motomura (#12) – Try #4

Goals

        Michael Shinomiya (#8) – 3/3

Kameli Soejima (#7) – 0/1

03:00 PM – Australia v. China (Pool B):

Match Recap

Australia struck first with a try under the post for Lewis Holland. Thomas Lucaas added the simple conversion to give Australia the early 7–0 lead. Despite Australia’s brilliant performance in its first match against Fiji, and China’s lackluster performance against Japan, the Australians struggled to show the same form that got them a win over the Fijians. A yellow card on Samuel Myers looked to give China a real chance of drawing the match level. Instead, an opportunistic takeaway sent Timothy Anstee streaking for a try under the post. Lucas added another simple conversion to put Australia in front by two full scores.

As the first half headed toward a close, Australia’s restart kick failed to go ten-metered. China tried to capitalize on the free kick with a push down the left wing and an attempt to kick and chase. Australia surrendered a penalty instead of a try and prevented China from doing anything with the good field position. Backed up, Australia won a penalty and used it to make a line break that ended with Benjamin O’Donnell try. Lucas failed to connect on the conversion, leaving China with a 19–0 hold to dig out from in the second half.

An early Try for Maurice Longbottom put the match likely out of reach. Lucas added his third conversion for a 26–0 lead with under five minutes remaining. A second try from Longbottom two minutes later left China looking deflated. Lucas added his fourth successful conversion to make it 33–0 with just over two minutes remaining. Having shaken off the rust from the early going. Australia started to push to bust the flood gates. A steal on the restart by Myers narrowly missed giving Longbottom his hat-trick score when Longbottom knocked the ball on in goal. But, as though the score was preordained, Longbottom took the ball from the following ruck and got his score. Lucas added the conversion. Edward Jenkins added a seventh try for Australia, and Lucas slotted a sixth conversion. A clever restart attempt by Australia resulted in a knock on and ended the match with Australia matching Japan’s margin over China. Australia 47, China 0.

STATS:

Australia

Tries

Lewis Holland (#4) – Try #1

Timothy Anstee (#7) – Try #2

Benjamin O’Donnell (#5) – Try #3

Maurice Longbottom (#11) – Try #4, Try #5, Try #6

Edward Jenkins (#9) – Try #7

Goals

Thomas Lucas (#10) – 6/7

China

Tries

Goals

03:22 PM – England v. Samoa (Pool A):

Match Recap

As could be said many times throughout the day, this match paired two of the blue bloods of sevens rugby. Samoa got on the board first with an inspired run by Joe Perez, who broke two tackles in the process. Patrick Faapale added the two points to make it a full seven-pointer. To the surprise of many, Samoa extended its lead to 14–0 with a minute remaining in the half, thanks to a try by Darren Kellet/Moore and another well-taken conversion by Faapale. England closed the half with a streaking run by Will Muir for a crucial try under the post. Will Edwards added the two points to get England within seven at the break.

The second half started exactly as England needed. A try from Charlie Kingham and conversion by Will Edwards drew the match level at 14 all. But the kickoff after the try just barely failed to go ten meters, giving Samoa a free kick at centerfield. England narrowly missed taking the lead when a pass from Ryan Olowofela was not taken in by Harry Glover. If Glover had caught the pass, England would surely have scored in the corner. Samoa won the scrum and tried to kick behind England’s defense. Samoa Toloa looked to have a line for the ball, but Will Edwards beat him to it, giving England good attacking position.

Samoa survived the attack, and tried to put something together of its own. Silas Talimao helped Samoa flip the field with two good runs. Standing at the England twenty-two as the hooter blared, Samoa won a penalty and looked to break the draw. A second penalty, directly in front of the sticks, gave Murphy Penetito a chance for a penalty drop goal for the win. The kick missed its mark, leaving the match tied at 14–14.

STATS:

England

Tries

Will Muir (#3) – Try #1

Charlie Kingham (#7) – Try #2

Goals

Will Edwards (#4) – 2/2

Samoa

Tries

Joe Perez (#11) – Try #1

Darren Kellet/Moore (#3) – Try #2

Goals

Patrick Faapale (#7) – 2/2

03:44 PM – Canada v. Ireland (Pool A):

Match Recap

With England sitting on a loss and a draw, Ireland entered the match against Canada with a chance of climbing up the Pool A standings. But a loss for the Irish would mean sitting at the bottom of the pool.

Canada struck first with a try from Liam Underwood. But a dangerous hit on a player in the air by Jared Douglas left Canada down a man with a yellow card penalty. Ireland threatened early in the penalty, but Canada managed to burn the penalty without giving up points. Canada threatened much of the rest of the half, but Ireland held strong in defense. With the hooter having blown, Ireland tired to get something going on offense, but the half ended with Terry Kennedy being dragged into touch, and only five points separating the teams.

Looking to register an excellent win, Ireland came out strong, stealing the second half restart. But Canada soon forced a turnover with a penalty at its own ten-meter line. Matt Mullins looked to have a chance on the right wing, but Ireland held him off and forced a turnover in the process. After winning a penalty and kicking into Canadian territory, Ireland’s Jordan Conroy managed to catch the edge of the Canadian defense and add a try. Billy Dardis capped it off with the conversion for the lead, leaving Canada three minutes to battle back.

With the clock ticking away, Canada lost possession on a penalty and Jordan Conroy wasted no time adding his second try of the match. Dardis could not push the lead to two scores. But with the restart coming at under thirty seconds left in the match, Ireland had secured at least a draw. Not satisfied with risking a draw, Ireland contested the restart well, leading to a Mark Roche try and conversion by Billy Dardis for the huge 19–5 victory for Ireland.

As expected, Ireland came to make a statement, and certainly did with that win.

STATS:

Canada

Tries

Liam Underwood (#9) – Try #1

Goals

Liam Underwood (#9) – 0/1

Ireland

Tries

Jordan Conroy (#11) – Try #1, Try #2

Mark Roche (#9) – Try #3

Goals

Billy Dardis (#4) – 2/3

04:06 PM – Chile v. Tonga (Pool C):

Match Recap

Chile continued its run of great form with a try in the second minute from Julio Blanc. Marcelo Torrealba was not able to connect on the kick from the right touch line, making it 5–0 for the Chileans. But Tonga, looking to bounce back from a tough loss to team USA, got its attack going. Chile remained staunch in defense, forcing a turnover prior to Tonga breaking into the Chilean twenty-two. Chile soon saw Blanc fly into the Tongan twenty-two, taking a hard, high tackle to be stopped from a try. Although there was no score, Tonga’s Fe’aomoeta Kalu was shown a yellow card for the play.

Carrying the advantage further, Chile added a third try, this time from Banjamin De Vits. Brangier Felipe added the conversion. And at the close of the half, even with Tonga back at full strength, the Chilean onslaught continued as De Vits added a second try. Torrealba could not add the extra two. Nevertheless, Chile stood in front an impressive 22–0 at the intermission.

In the second half, Chile continued to pour it own Tonga with a try by Lucas Westcott and conversion from Rodrigo Fernandez to start the half. After stealing the restart, Pedro Pablo Verschae found a seam for a rubber, picked up for a try by Martin Verschae. Fernandez’s kick failed, but it was about all that was off for Chile in the match at that point.

Another stolen restart once again left Tonga looking for answered. A third try by De Vits pushed it to 39–0. Fernandez missed the conversion. But in the process of De Vits’s try, Tonga’s Siope Pouhila was shown a red card for a blow to the head.

With time winding down, Chile won a penalty at a twenty-two meter scrum and opted to kick to touch to end the match. The win has placed Chile in prime position to contend for the top seed. With only Chile and Australia boasting two wins, a win over team USA, who played its second match right after the Chilean victory over Tonga, would see Chile in at least a top two seed on Day two.

STATS:

Chile

Tries

Julio Blanc (#11) – Try #1

Pedro Pablao Verschae (#2) – Try #2

Banjamin De Vits (#12) – Try #3, Try #4, Try #7

Lucas Westcott (#6) – Try #5

Martin Verschae (#3) – Try #6

Goals

Marcelo Torrealba (#4) – 0/3

Felipe Brangier (#1) – 1/1

Rodrigo Fernandez (#5) – 1/3

Tonga

Tries

Goals

04:28 PM – New Zealand v. USA (Pool C):

Match Recap

A team that the Eagles had never beaten until just two years ago, the All Blacks took the pitch looking to overcome a slow start against a red-hot Chile. Team USA looked to build on a strong win over Tonga.

New Zealand struck first with a second-minute try by Luke Masirewa. Laters Laulala could not add the conversion. But with the score, New Zealand had already surpassed its points total against Chile. A second try from Masirewa following a stiff arm on Martin Iosefo, stretched lead. And this time, Laulala hitting the conversion, making it 12–0.

A quarter way into the match, the Eagles were looking for some possession. They succeeded in taking the restart, but faced a hard-hitting Kiwi defense. Following two big penalties, team USA finally got on the board at the close of the sixth minute, with a try from Ben Pinkelman. Folau Niua could not slot the kick through, making it 12–5 in the final minute of the half.

Just after the hooter, team USA won a penalty just inside its own half. Folau Niua took the slow tap, then hit Pinkelman with a pass. Pinkelman, broke five tackles before being brought to the deck at the New Zealand twenty-two. Despite good attacking pressure, a knock on by Matai Leuta at the New Zealand twenty-two with a potential path for the try in front of him, ended the half at New Zealand 12, USA 5.

The Eagles got an early line break from Stephen Tomasin to break into the New Zealand half. But, as is always true of the All Blacks, the defense was staunch. Martin Iosefo turned on the magic to get to the five-meter line and win a penalty. A floating pass from Leuta to Tomasin just about ended the attack, but Tomasin held on and the ball got back to Iosefo for a try to the left of the post. The sure-footed Folau Niua nailed the conversion to tie the match at 12–12.

Iosefo stole the restart and the Eagles went to work, looking for their third try of the match. A pass out from Ben Pinkelman to Kevon Williams missed its mark, slowing the Eagles down, but not surrendering possession. A penalty at the New Zealand ten set up an attacking five-meter line out throw for team USA. The throw was uncontested and the Eagles worked the ball right. Make Unufe took the contact and the official deemed the ball lost forward in the tackle, giving New Zealand a defensive scrum feed. But the Americans forced a penalty right away and scored a try from Joe Schroeder in the thirteenth minute. Folau Niua added the points for the seven-point lead, with the final restart coming with twenty-three seconds left in the match.

The Eagles stole the ball right after the line out and scored a final try in the left corner with Stephen Tomasin. Niua could not add the tough conversion, but the Eagles had the win. USA 24, New Zealand 12. The margin left team USA to play Chile for a guaranteed birth in the top two spots come tomorrow. The win secures the Eagles a place in the quarterfinal. New Zealand, on the other hand, is left with the possibility of missing the quarterfinals for the first time in program history.

STATS:

New Zealand

Tries

Luke Masirewa (#5) – Try #1, Try #2.

Goals

Luteru Laulala (#7) – 1/2

USA

Tries

Ben Pinkelman (#2) – Try #1

Martin Iosefo (#12) – Try #2.

Joe Schroeder (#3) – Try #3

Stephen Tomasin (#9) – Try #4

Goals

        Folau Niua (#7) – 2/4

**BREAK**

06:10 PM – Fiji v. China (Pool B):

Match Recap

Fiji entered its final match in very uncomfortable territory. If China could pull the massive upset, then Fiji would miss the quarterfinals. A victory would almost certainly keep Fiji in contention. But the points differential with Japan is almost insurmountable.

China shockingly struck first, for the first points for China in the tournament with a try by Changchun Shan. Fiji soon responded with a try by Viliame Bololailai and conversion by Nocenielie Batane for the slim lead at the midway point of the first half. A forward pass narrowly saved Fiji from a second China try late into the sixth minute. A handling error by Fiji resulted in a five-meter attacking scrum for China in the final thirty seconds of the half. It resulted in Shan’s second try of the half and a 10–7 lead for China at the break.

Fiji started the second half looking much more like itself with a try by Alivoso Rauto, shaking Chinese defenders in the process. The conversion by Batine made it 14–10. A second quick try by Netani Vakayalia and the conversion  by Batine made it 21–10. But China’s Shan made it a hat trick of unconverted tries to keep the match close with three minutes remaining. But two quick tries for Fiji put the match largely out of reach. A Yellow card to Jasa Veremalua gave China a man advantage to attempt to land a consolation try, but nothing more was on offer. Fiji 36, China 15.

STATS:

Fiji

Tries

Viliame Bololailai (#5) – Try #1

Alivoso Rauto (#8) – Try #2

Netani Vakayalia (#11) – Try #3

Eroni Vucago –(#6) – Try #4

Anare Tevita (#4) – Try #5

Goals

Batine (#10) – 5/5

China

Tries

Changchun Shan (#5) – Try #1, Try #2, Try #3

Goals

Shan – 0/2

(#12) – 0/1

06:32 PM – Australia v. Japan (Pool B):

Match Recap

Midway through the first half, Japan struck first with a try from Yoshihiro Noguchi. The conversion by Michael Shiomiya made it a 7–0 deficit for Australia. Simon Kennewell helped to close the gape with a quick try, but Lucas Thomas could not add the conversion, leaving Japan ahead. But Edward Jenkins brought Australia the lead with a try in the left corner just before the half. A scary moment in that final phase of play saw a Japanese player down for a prolonged period, but he fortunately avoided serious injury.

Australia struck first with a converted try by Lachlan Anderson. The long conversion from Lucas Thomas made it Australia 17, Japan 7. Anderson again scored, this time from a kick ahead by Charles Taylor. Thomas’s second conversion made it 24–7 with under three minutes to go. With time running out, Australia made it 29–7 with the Timonthy Anstee try. Lewis Holland could not connect on the conversion. A final try from Edward Jenkins and conversion from Holland made it 36–7. The win almost certainly sees Australia top seed in the quarterfinals tomorrow.

STATS:

Australia

Tries

Simon Kennewell (#2)–Try #1

Edward Jenkins (#9) – Try #2, Try #6

Lachlan Anderson (#12) – Try #3, Try #4

Timothy Anstee (#7) – Try #5

Goals

Lucas Thomas (#10) – 2/4

Holland (#4) – 1/2

Japan

Tries

Yoshihiro Noguchi (#11) – Try #1

Goals

Michael Shinomiya (#8) – 1/1

06:54 PM – England v. Ireland (Pool A):

Match Recap

The teams entered knowing that the winner of the match would secure a quarterfinal bid, but the loser would be left with a chance of being in the bowl competition.

Two converted tries by the midway point of the first half from Harry Glover and Will Edwards respectively, each capped by an Edwards conversion, gave England the crucial 14–0 advantage. The Will Muir try in the final minute of the half, and Edwards’ third conversion of the half made it 21–0. England extended the second-half lead with an unconverted try from Ferguson Guiry. Just before the end of the match, Ireland got its only points of the match with a try from Terry Kennedy. Fortunately a head to head

England

STATS:

England

Tries

Harry Glover (#10)  – Try #1

Will Edwards (#4) – Try #2

Will Muir (#3) – Try #3

Ferguson Guiry (#6) – Try #4

Goals

Will Edwards (#4) – 3/3

Ireland

Tries

Terry Kennedy (#10) – Try #1

Goals

07:16 PM – Canada v. Samoa (Pool A):

Match Recap

Canada and Samoa entered with a win and you’re in target. But a loss, depending on margin could leave either team in the bowl competition. A yellow card three minutes into the first half to Silao Talimao saw Samoa down a man. Canada capitalized with a try by Liam Underwood and conversion from Pat Kay. But Samoa leveled it before half with a try from Alamanda Motuga and conversion by Patrick Faapale.

John Moonlight put Canada back in front with an unconverted try. But Samoa Toloa scored a try to level it. With under two minutes left, Samoa held off Canadian pressure inside Samoa twenty-two, forcing a penalty. As the hooter sounded,

(17–12)

STATS:

Canada

Tries

Liam Underwood (#9) – Try #1

John Moonlight (#4) –Try #2

Goals

Pat Kay (#10) – 1/1

Samoa

Tries

Alamanda Motuga (#5) – Try #1

Samoa Toloa (#10) – Try #2

(#1) – Try #3

Goals

Patrick Faapale (#7) – 1/1

(#6) – 0/1

07:38 PM – New Zealand v. Tonga (Pool C):

Match Recap

New Zealand scored first with a crucial converted try by Salesi Rayasi. The conversion from Luteru Laulala made it a seven-pointer. A breakaway try from Chase Tiatia and a conversion by Laulala made it 14–0 at the break. The margin was important, because New Zealand’s path to the quarterfinals required it to overtake Ireland, who stood seven points ahead of a victorious New Zealand in points differential.

New Zealand entered the half where it needed to be and never looked back. A try NZ up on Ireland by 12.

STATS:

New Zealand

Tries

Salesi Rayasi (#4) – Try #1, Try #4

(#9) – Try #2

(#11) – Try #3,Try #5

(#3) – Try #6 (on hooter)

Goals

(#7) – 2/4

Tonga

Tries

Goals

08:00 PM – USA v. Chile (Pool C):

Match Recap

Winner finishes second unless wins by 66 for Chile or by 78 for USA

A draw will see Chile 2nd and USA 3rd

A loss sees the loser at 4th

For the winner, would go a second place seed to face Fiji, barring a huge victory to catch Australia. To the loser a fourth place seed and a date with Japan. If the sides draw, USA plays England

Team USA scored first with a streaking try from Kevon Williams. Flaunt Niua could not convert that try, but he did succeed in his second attempt after Ryan Matyas put team USA ahead by ten off a great setup pass from Maka Unufe. Niua made it twelve when his kick from the left side of the post bounced off the right post and through, his second such lucky bounce of the day. Unufe added his own try with a blistering run around the Chilean defense for a try to end the half. Niua’s kick from the right side of the post hit the left upright, but failed to go through.

Heading into the final half of day 1, team USA was looking to join Australia as the lone undefeated teams. To do that, the Eagles would need to hold off a Chilean squad that had impressed all day until the first half against the Eagles. Thirty seconds in, Chile got on the board with a try from Felipe Brangier and conversion by Marcelo Torrealba. A second quick try by Brangier and impressive kick by Torrealba brought Chile to within three of the home team. But Maka Unufe got team USA back on the right foot with a pass from Ryan Matyas that started the run, but Unufe’s athleticism and spin move on the Chilean defender is what made it a try. Stephen Tomasin could not get the kick over, making it 22–14 with three minutes remaining. With a minute to go, Chris Mattina broke free for a try under the post, which was converted by Matyas.

Ahead 29–14 on full time, team USA had clinched the two seed, sending Chile to the four, but Chile still sought a consolation score and got it from Nicolas Garafulic

STATS:

USA

Tries

Kevon Williams (#11) – Try #1

Ryan Matyas (#5) – Try #2 (set up by Maka)

Maka Unufe (#8) – Try #3 Try #4

(#10) – Try #5

Goals

Niua (#7) – 1/3 (converted second kick off the post and in)

Tomasin (#9) – 0/1

Ryan Matyas (#5) – 1/1

Chile

Tries

Felipe Brangier (#1) – Try #1, Try #2

Nicolas Garafulic (#8) – Try #3

Goals

        (#4) – 2/2

        (#10) – 1/1

Standings:

1        Australia        9        +112 <=Top unless Chile wins by 66 or USA wins by 78

2        USA                9        +42 <=Wins pool with win & 2d seed, gotta win 78 to to

3        Samoa        8        +10 <= Third unless USA and Chile draws

4        Chile                7        +38 <=Wins pool with win & 2d seed, gotta win 66 to

5        Japan                6        +18 

6        England        6        +12

7        Fiji                6        –9 <=

8        NZ                5        +5 <= Win by at least 10 and reach QF as 8

9        Ireland        5        –12 <= ELIMINATED

10        Canada        5        –10 <=ELIMINATED

11        Tonga                3        –85 <= ELIMINATED

12        China                3        –114 <=ELIMINATED

  • Pool A

TEAM        W        L        D        PF        PA        DIF        RNK PTS

Samoa        1        0        1        41        31        +5        8

England        1        1        1        50        38        +12        6

Canada        1        1        0        36        46        -10        5

Ireland        1        2        0        24        45        -12        5

  • Pool B

TEAM        W        L        D        PF        PA        DIF        RNK PTS

Australia        3        0        0        112        7        +105        9

Japan        1        1        1        80        62        +18        6

Fiji                1        1        1        61        70        -9        6

China        0        3        0        15        129        -114        3

  • Pool C

TEAM        W        L        D        PF        PA        DIF        RNK PTS

Chile                2        0        0        53        17        +43        6

USA                2        0        0        70        33        +37        6

NZ                1        2        0        36        31        +5        5

Tonga        0        3        0        7        92        -85        3

COLLEGE GAMES

04:50 PM – UC DAVIS v. Stanford:

Match Recap

UC Davis struck first with a try under the post. Stanford’s #14, streaked down the left touch line to level the match early in the first half. But UC Davis had the last word before the half, with a converted try to set the margin at 14–7. A third try by UC Davis pushed it to a two-score lead. Another UC Davis try put the match well out of reach for Stanford, even with the conversion missing its mark. But not going down without a fight, Stanford’s #14 again streaking through for an impressive try to give him a brace. Even with the match seemingly out of reach, Stanford added another late try, to make it a respectable margin at the end of the match. (We think it was 24–19).

05:10 PM – USC v. Santa Clara:

Match Recap

Santa Clara strikes first with an early try in the left corner. USC powered back with a cracking run from the restart, which set up a try under the post to give SC the narrow lead following the conversion. Another monster ours run by SC’s #2, gives the Trojans their second try of the first half, this one unconverted. But Santa Clara found space to score one beneath the sticks to tie the match at 12 on halftime.

In the second half, SC scored first to go back in front. The try in the corner left the conversion wanting. Another USC try, this one under the posts, pushed the Trojans to a 24–12 lead. With just enough time for a restart, Santa Clara scored a converted try under the post to cut the lead to 24–19. With no time left, SC’s number 5 took the kick and ran down the left side, rolling through a not held tackle and just barely crossing the line. Although it resulted in points, making the final 29–19, it was a peculiarly selfish play to risk the win for personal glory.

05:30 PM – Arizona v. Cal Poly (U7):

Match Recap

In a match pitting two teams that really impressed in their opening matches, Arizona struck first with a converted try early in the first half. Keeping the pressure on, one-time Collegiate Rugby Championship finalists the Wildcats scored a second try in the corner. (12–0). Cal Poly survived a difficult challenge on the restart to finally get some possession. A third Arizona try of the first half left the margin 17–0 at the break. Cal Poly got on the board early in the second half to close it to 17–5. Another Cal Poly try made things interesting, at 17–10. But the Wildcats stopped the bleeding with a second-half try of their own, making it 22–10 late into the match, where it remained on full time.

05:50 PM – CWU v. SDSU (U8):

Match Recap

Central Washington hit with the first tries of the match, each coming in the first half. Only the first try was converted, which put CWU in front 12–0. A third try, also converted, made it a steep hole for SDSU to climb back out of. But Central Washington was not done, adding yet another converted try, still in the first half, to make it 26–0.

The second half started much like the first, with CWU scoring right away with another breakaway try under the post. By this point, the Aztecs looked to be defeated both on the board and mentally. (33–0). Central Washington soon added two more unconverted tries to push the match to 43–0 when the hooter blew. There was still just enough time for a restart, but a knock on almost instantly by SDSU ended the match at CWU 43, SDSU 0.

Day 2 Matches

10:00 AM: UC Davis v. San Diego State (U9)

San Diego State came out in force. Two converted first-half tries for the Aztecs built an insurmountable lead. Two second-half unconverted tries saw the Aztecs advance.

10:20 AM: USC v. Cal Poly (U10)

Cal Poly fought hard to get the first 7 points of the match in the sixth minute. The Trojans came out strong to start the second half with a seven-pointer of their own. With the final minutes ticking away, Cal Poly regained the lead with an unconverted try. In the end, USC could not get ball in hand to try to make the comeback. Cal Poly came out on top 12–7 to book a place against San Diego State later in the day.

10:40 AM Cup Semifinal #1: Arizona v. Central Washington (U11)

The big match of the Day 2 morning was the battle of undefeateds. After a back-and-forth first half, there was nothing to separate the teams. Arizona came agonizingly close to breaking the 0–0 stalemate but the Wildcat ball carrier lost the ball in his attempt to reach for the try, which ended the half. Central Washington finally got the scoring started with a try in the far right corner a minute and a half into the second half. But the missed conversion left it anyone’s match. A second CWU try, shortly after the restart, stretched the lead to 10–0. A third unconverted try with 2:24 remaining, saw CWU put the match away.

11:44 AM: SDSU v. Cal Poly (U12)

San Diego registered two scores through #15 down the left wing. An excellent conversion by #6 made it a 12–0 lead for the Aztecs. #6 soon added a try of his own moments later. (Announcer may have said his name is Harrison Vargo?). He was unable to add the extra two points, but his side still led 17–0. A third try form #15 (Aarie Flynn?) in the left corner made it 22–0 at the break.

An exchange of unconverted tries in the first three minutes of the second half made 27–5 as time ticked away. A Cal Poly try with two minutes left kept a slim chance of a come back open. In the end, San Diego State held its margin, and advanced to a date with Arizona for a chance to meet Central Washington in the final.

01:32 PM: Arizona v. SDSU (U13)

Playing for a birth in the final against undefeated Central Washington, Arizona got on the board first with a try in the third minute as the result of tremendous pressure against the San Diego State defense. But the Aztecs did not bcak down, scoring a converted try to take a 7–5 lead at halftime. In the second half, however, it was all Wildcats, posting three tries and two conversions to book a rematch against CWU with the 24–7 victory over San Diego State.

04:38 PM Cup Final: CWU v. Arizona

Seeking redemption from a loss earlier in the day, Arizona took a lead in the third minute of the match with a converted try. (#3) for Central Washington notched a try to cut the margin to two. #3’s second try for CWU gave them the lead with 50s left in the half. (10–0). Makeable conversion was missed by #5. The restart coincided with the hooter. Arizona worked to CWU ten-meter line before a penalty gave the ball back to CWU. But a not-releasing penalty by 14 of CWU gave Arizona’s 10 a tap and go to the CWU 5-meter. Zona score by #3 Ryan something. Try under post. Conversion good for a 14–10 lead at the half.

#14 for CWU cuts through the Arizona defense for thirty-meters but penalized, giving Arizona ball at own 10-meter. A second penalty leads Arizona into the CWU twenty-two, where a CWU knock gives Wildcats a scrum feed. A penalty at CWU 5-meter with 5 minutes left. A slow tap then pass out to the left wing from a tap starting to the right of the posts. Arizona works back right, tries to hit the right wing, but a dropped pass goes to CWU #12’s hands who streaked down the left touch line, but was chased down right at the corner of the Arizona goal by Zona #5 with around 4:20 left. CWU stole the lineout. It leads to a CWU scrum, and works to the right almost for a CWU try, but a penalty on the try line for diving over, saves Arizona. Zona kicks for touch but doesn’t go out, CWU takes it sends it to the opposite field for try in the corner by #6 Alex something. Conversion no good. CWU up 15–14 with restart coming at just under two minutes remaining.

Arizona won restart and single player runs up left touch line. Without support, he loses the ball in the tackle, giving CWU a scrum feed just inside own 10-meter. (About 35-meters from own goal). CWU tries to run after winning the scrum but the ball is knocked to touch by Arizona. Wildcats contest the lienout, but CWU wins it and goes wide. With 7s left, CWU loses a penalty, and Zona has ball at midfield. A pass to the Zona wing gets knocked forward to give CWU a scrum feed on full time. CWU wins it and kicks to touch for the narrow win.

Day 2 College Match Schedule

10:00 AM: UC Davis v. San Diego State (U9)

10:20 AM: USC v. Cal Poly (U10)

10:40 AM Cup Semifinal #1: Arizona v. Central Washington (U11)

*Break*

11:44 AM: SDSU v. Cal Poly (U12)

*Break*

01:32 PM Cup Semifinal #2: Arizona v. SDSU (U13)

*Break*

04:38 PM Cup Final: CWU v. Arizona (U14)

 

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