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AP FACT CHECK: Clinton & Trump at the Debate

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Donald Trump's habit of peddling hype and fabrication emerged unabated in the first presidential debate while Hillary Clinton played it cautiously in her statements, though not without error. They both denied making statements that they are on the record as saying.

A look at some of the claims in the debate and how they compare with the facts:

TRUMP, denying Clinton's accusation that he supported the Iraq war: "Wrong. Wrong." Later: "That is a mainstream media nonsense put out by her. I was against the war in Iraq."



VIEWER'S GUIDE: Look for trust, temperament themes in debate

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The most telling moments in presidential debates often come out of the blue - an offhand remark or unrehearsed gesture that helps to reveal the essence of a candidate who's already been poked, prodded and inspected for years.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump have competing missions heading into Monday night's leadoff debate of the general election campaign: Hers to overcome the trust questions that have bedeviled her for decades. His to convince voters that he has the good judgment and restraint required of a president.



Seafood caught by foreign crews confined on boats

HONOLULU (AP) — Pier 17 doesn’t even show up on most Honolulu maps. Cars whiz past it on their way to Waikiki’s famous white sand beaches. Yet passing tourists, let alone locals, are unaware that just behind a guarded gate, another world exists: foreign fishermen confined to American boats for years at a time.



OBAMA LEGACY: In energy and pollution

HANGZHOU, China (AP) -- Mostly unnoticed amid the political brawl over climate change, the United States has undergone a quiet transformation in how and where it gets its energy during Barack Obama's presidency, slicing the nation's output of polluting gases that are warming Earth.



Hurricane churns toward HI; people stock up, board up

HILO, Hawaii (AP) -- Preparing for what could be the first hurricane to make landfall in Hawaii in years, residents on the Big Island are stocking up on food and water and seeking shelter for their animals.

The National Weather Service issued a hurricane warning as the storm dubbed Madeline churned west Tuesday toward the island, urging residents to rush through preparations to protect themselves and their property and expect hurricane conditions within the next 36 hours.



Obama creates largest marine protected area

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Barack Obama this past Friday expanded a national monument off the coast of Hawaii, creating a safe zone for tuna, sea turtles and thousands of other species in what will be the world's largest marine protected area.
 
Obama's proclamation quadrupled in size a monument originally created by President George W. Bush in 2006. The Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument will contain some 582,578 square miles, more than twice the size of Texas.
 



To reverse damage of sitting, take an hour-long walk

LONDON (AP) -- If you spend all day sitting, then you might want to schedule some time for a brisk walk - just make sure you can spare at least an hour.

Scientists analyzing data from more than 1 million people found that it takes about 60 to 75 minutes of "moderate intensity" exercise to undo the damage of sitting for at least eight hours a day. Not exercising and sitting all day is as dangerous as being obese or smoking, they found.



Hawaii Dem congressman Mark Takai dies

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Rep. Mark Takai has died.

Takai, a first-term Democrat from Hawaii, 49, had been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. He announced in May that he would not seek re-election.

His office released a statement saying that Takai died at home Wednesday surrounded by his family.

He was a longtime lieutenant colonel in the Hawaii Army National Guard and served on the Armed Services and Natural Resources committees.



Pentagon ends ban on transgender troops in military

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Transgender people will be allowed to serve openly in the U.S. military, the Pentagon announced Thursday, ending one of the last bans on service in the armed forces.

Saying it's the right thing to do, Defense Secretary Ash Carter laid out a yearlong implementation plan declaring that "Americans who want to serve and can meet our standards should be afforded the opportunity to compete to do so."



Temporary blindness tied to smartphone use in dark

LONDON (AP) -- Warning: Looking at your smartphone while lying in bed at night could wreak havoc on your vision.

Two women went temporarily blind from constantly checking their phones in the dark, say doctors who are now alerting others to the unusual phenomenon.

The solution: Make sure to use both eyes when looking at your smartphone screen in the dark.

In Thursday's New England Journal of Medicine, doctors detailed the cases of the two women, ages 22 and 40, who experienced "transient smartphone blindness" for months.



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