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VIDEO: Today's Headline News from Associated Press

Students are reunited with family following a shooting at Berrendo Middle School, Tuesday, Jan. 14, 2014, in Roswell, N.M. Roswell police said the suspected shooter was arrested at the school, but authorities have not said if there were any injuries. The school has been placed on lockdown. No other details are yet available. (AP Photo/Roswell Daily Record, Mark Wilson)

AT LEAST 2 KIDS HURT IN NEW MEXICO SCHOOL SHOOTING
 
ROSWELL, N.M. (AP) -- A shooter opened fire Tuesday morning at a middle school in the southeastern New Mexico city of Roswell, injuring at least two students before being taken into custody.
 
Officials at University Medical Center in Lubbock, Texas, say a 14-year-old boy was flown there in critical condition and a 13-year-old girl was en route in serious condition. Information from nurses treating the boy indicates he was the shooter's target, hospital spokesman Eric Finley said.
 
Police say the suspect opened fire at Berrendo Middle School as classes were starting for the day. A statement from the state police said authorities responded at 8:11 a.m.
 
Lorena Beltran told the Albuquerque Journal her daughter, who attends the school, said a male student was shot in the face.
 
Roswell police say the school was placed on lockdown, and the suspected shooter was arrested. Age and other details on the suspect were not immediately released.
 
Police said children were bused to a nearby mall, where parents could pick up them up.
 
JUDGE: $765M MIGHT NOT COVER NFL CONCUSSION CLAIMS
 
PHILADELPHIA (AP) -- A federal judge denied preliminary approval of a $765 million settlement of NFL concussion claims, fearing it may not be enough to cover 20,000 retired players.
 
U.S. District Judge Anita B. Brody asked for more financial analysis from the parties, a week after players' lawyers filed a detailed payout plan.
 
"I am primarily concerned that not all retired NFL football players who ultimately receive a qualifying diagnosis or their (families) ... will be paid," Brody wrote in a 12-page opinion issued Tuesday.
 
The proposed settlement, negotiated over several months, is designed to last at least 65 years.
 
The awards would vary based on an ex-player's age and diagnosis. A younger retiree with Lou Gehrig's disease would get $5 million, those with serious dementia cases would get $3 million and an 80-year-old with early dementia would get $25,000. Retirees without symptoms would get baseline screening, and follow-up care if needed.
 
Some critics have argued that the NFL, with more than $9 billion in annual revenues, was getting away lightly. But the players' lawyers said they will face huge challenges just to get the case to trial. They would have to prove the injuries were linked to the players' NFL service and should not be handled through league arbitration.
 
Sol Weiss, a lead lawyer for the ex-players, remained confident the class-action settlement will ultimately be approved.
 
APPEALS COURT SETS ASIDE INTERNET RULES
 
WASHINGTON (AP) -- In a setback for the Obama administration's goal of Internet openness, a federal appeals court Tuesday set aside Federal Communications Commission rules designed to ensure that transmission of all Internet content be treated equally.
 
The anti-discrimination and anti-blocking requirements bar broadband providers from prioritizing some types of Internet traffic over others.
 
A three-judge panel said that the FCC has the authority to regulate broadband providers' treatment of Internet traffic. However, the judges concluded that the FCC failed to establish that its regulations don't overreach.
 
"Even though the commission has general authority to regulate in this arena, it may not impose requirements" that violate statutory mandates, wrote appeals judge David Tatel. The judges said the FCC's rule in effect treated all Internet service providers as common carriers - transporters of people or goods for the general public on regular routes at set rates. Examples of common carriers include airlines, railroads, trucking companies and utilities.
 
But the court said the commission itself already had classified broadband providers as exempt from treatment as common carriers, which set up a legal contradiction. The FCC failed to establish that its regulations do not impose common carrier obligations on the Internet companies, the judges ruled.
 
The decision empowers leading Internet providers to decide which Internet services - such as Netflix movies, YouTube videos, news stories and more - they would allow to be transmitted to consumers over their networks.

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