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HAL earns first-ever Aviation Carbon Credits

Environmental benefits equal to removing 700 Cars from roads annually
Mark Dunkerley, Hawaiian Air president and CEO, holds the plaque presented to the airline yesterday for earning the aviation industry’s first-ever verified carbon credits. Participating in the ceremony was Hawai’i Governor Neil Abercrombie (right), and Hawaii State Senator J. Kalani English (left). [Photo Credit: Rae Huo]

HONOLULU– Hawaiian Airlines has earned the first-ever aviation based carbon credits, having reduced its carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by nearly 22,000 metric tons over the past six years using an innovative, eco-friendly engine washing technology developed by Pratt & Whitney.

“We are proud to be the first airline to receive verified carbon credits for reducing emissions,” said Mark Dunkerley, president and CEO of Hawaiian Airlines. “Importantly, engine washing with EcoPower® is helping us to mitigate rising fuel costs and significantly reduce Hawaiian’s carbon footprint at the same time.”

A carbon credit is a verified means of measuring the reduction of industrial CO2 emissions from the environment, with one credit equal to the removal of one ton of CO2.

Hawaiian’s earning of carbon credits has been quantified and certified under the Verified Carbon Standard, the world’s leading independent standard for the measurement and verification of greenhouse gas emissions and the creation of carbon credits.

Hawaiian’s reduction of CO2 emissions using Pratt & Whitney’s patented EcoPower engine washing system has had the equivalent effect of taking 700 cars off the road annually.

In addition, since launching the program in 2005, Hawaiian’s commitment to the engine-washing system has saved the company more than 2.5 million gallons of fuel, along with an estimated 26,000 gallons of water that would have been used with traditional washing methods.

“It is appropriate that our first EcoPower customer, Hawaiian Airlines, is also the first customer to be awarded Verified Carbon Units as a result,” said Rick Deurloo, vice president, Pratt & Whitney Sales, Americas.

The EcoPower system reduces fuel burn and eliminates three pounds of CO2 for every pound of fuel saved, while also reducing engine temperatures and normal wear. It uses pure, atomized water to wash aircraft engines in a closed-loop system that filters contaminants and reuses water, eliminating potential contaminant runoff. The system is more effective and faster than traditional engine washing processes.

Hawaiian’s engine washing program is part of a broader continuous effort to mitigate high fuel costs and their impact on its customers. The company has commitments to acquire a fleet of new, more fuel efficient aircraft valued at more than $8 billion and has installed performance-enhancing winglets, lighter passenger seats and lighter service carts on its existing wide-body fleet.

Hawaiian employs a number of other measures to reduce its carbon footprint, including a variety of other fuel conservation measures, recycling of waste materials and use of renewable and biodegradable resources in onboard meal packaging and utensils.

The company is also part of an airline industry movement to support development of clean burning alternatives to petroleum-based fuel for powering jet engines.



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