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Associated Press

Family: Teen pilot who crashed in ocean knew risks

PLAINFIELD, Ind. (AP) -- Haris Suleman knew that flying around the world carried risks. But like adventurers before him, the 17-year-old pilot from Indiana also believed dreams aren't achieved without taking chances.

"Why does any explorer undertake the necessary risks in order to accomplish their dream? Because that person has a drive, they have a focus, and they have a need to explore that dream," he wrote in a July 15 blog for The Huffington Post.



32,000 Mormon missionaries to get iPad minis

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) -- The Mormon church is moving forward with its plan to arm missionaries with iPad minis and broaden their proselytizing to social media.

A test program that began last fall with 6,500 missionaries serving in the United States and Japan went well, prompting the initiative's expansion, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints said in a news release this week.

Church leaders expect to have the specially configured mobile devices in the hands of more than 32,000 missionaries by early 2015.



California chicken linked to salmonella recalled

LOS ANGELES (AP) -- A California chicken producer has issued its first recall since being linked to an outbreak of an antibiotic-resistant strain of salmonella that has been making people sick for more than a year, company and federal food officials said Thursday night.



Obama picks ex-P&G head to lead Veterans Affairs

WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Barack Obama plans to nominate former Proctor & Gamble executive Robert McDonald as the next Veterans Affairs secretary, as the White House seeks to shore up an agency beset by treatment delays and struggling to deal with an influx of new veterans returning from wars in Iraq and Afghanistan.

An administration official said Obama would announce McDonald's appointment Monday. If confirmed by the Senate, McDonald would succeed Eric Shinseki, the retired four-star general who resigned last month as the scope of the issues at veterans' hospitals became apparent.



T1red of p@sswords? Y0u @re Nt @lone

CHICAGO (AP) -- Good thing she doesn't need a password to get into heaven. That's what Donna Spinner often mutters when she tries to remember the growing list of letter-number-and-symbol codes she's had to create to access her various online accounts.

"At my age, it just gets too confusing," says the 72-year-old grandmother who lives outside Decatur, Illinois.

But this is far from just a senior moment. Frustration over passwords is as common across the age brackets as the little reminder notes on which people often write them.



Obama: US sending military advisers to Iraq

WASHINGTON (AP) — Edging back into a military role in Iraq, President Barack Obama on Thursday said he was dispatching up to 300 military advisers to help quell the rising insurgency in the crumbling nation. He called on Iraqi leaders to govern with a more "inclusive agenda" to ensure the country does not descend into civil war.



Obama: 275 US forces deploying to Iraq

WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Barack Obama is notifying Congress that about 275 U.S. military personnel could deploy to Iraq.

Obama says the forces are going to provide support and security for U.S. personnel and the U.S. Embassy in Baghdad. He says the forces are equipped for combat and will remain in Iraq until the security situation becomes such that they are no longer needed.

About 160 troops are already in Iraq, including 50 Marines and more than 100 Army soldiers. Some of those soldiers have only recently arrived.



AP Analysis: Turmoil blurring Mideast borders

CAIRO (AP) -- Working in secret, European diplomats drew up the borders that have defined the Middle East's nations for nearly a century - but now civil war, sectarian bloodshed and leadership failures threaten to rip that map apart.



Vets watch as insurgents undo sacrifices in Iraq

(AP) — For an entire night, Marine Sgt. Colin Archipley crouched low atop a roof as U.S. artillery slammed insurgent hideouts in the Iraqi city of Fallujah.

At dawn, when orders came to destroy a suspected enemy weapons cache, Archipley discovered his unit was on top of the same building, and insurgents were holed up floors below. American forces blasted the structure, scattering the fighters.

The savage combat inflicted heavy casualties on Lima Company, and dozens of American soldiers were killed before the house-by-house battles ended in late 2004.



Mormon women's group founder faces excommunication

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — Two months after Mormon Kate Kelly led hundreds in a demonstration to shed light on gender inequality in the religion — defying church orders to stay off Temple Square — the founder of a prominent Mormon women's group is facing excommunication.



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