Associated Press

How does it feel? Dylan wins the Nobel in literature

STOCKHOLM (AP) — Bob Dylan won the 2016 Nobel Prize in literature Thursday for expanding the poetic possibilities of music with a body of work that includes "Like a Rolling Stone," ''Blowin' in the Wind" and "Mr. Tambourine Man" - a stunning announcement that marked the first time the prestigious award was given to a musician.

Reporters and others who had gathered at the Swedish Academy's headquarters reacted with a loud cheer as the name of the singer and songwriter was read out.

Dylan, 75, is widely regarded as the most influential poet-musician of his generation.

3 Hawaiian Air employees arrested for theft

HONOLULU (AP) — Three Hawaiian Airlines baggage handlers are being investigated for theft after guns were reported stolen from the checked luggage of law enforcement officers.

Maui police and federal agents arrested the airline employees Thursday. A 28-year old Wailuku man and a 52-year old Kihei man are suspected of first-degree theft, while a 29-year-old Wailuku man is accused of third-degree theft in connection with a separate investigation.

Hawaiian Airlines security investigators had alerted police to the suspected thefts in August.

WHY IT MATTERS: Issues at stake in election

WASHINGTON (AP) -- A selection of issues at stake in the presidential election and their impact on Americans, in brief:


Researchers sample unusually rich deep-sea area off Hawaii

HONOLULU (AP) -- Federal researchers have just returned from an expedition to study the biodiversity and mechanisms of an unusually rich deep-sea ecosystem off the coast of Hawaii's Big Island.

Study: Humans inherit murderous tendencies

WASHINGTON (AP) — Evolution and genetics seem to have baked a certain amount of murder into humans as a species, but civilization has tamed some of the savage beast in us, according to a new study.

Scientists calculated the rate at which more than 1,000 mammal species kill their own kind, and noticed how closely related species have similar rates of lethal violence. They essentially found that where a species is on evolutionary tree of life tells a lot about how violent the species is to its own kind. And we're in a rough neighborhood.

AP FACT CHECK: Clinton & Trump at the Debate

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Donald Trump's habit of peddling hype and fabrication emerged unabated in the first presidential debate while Hillary Clinton played it cautiously in her statements, though not without error. They both denied making statements that they are on the record as saying.

A look at some of the claims in the debate and how they compare with the facts:

TRUMP, denying Clinton's accusation that he supported the Iraq war: "Wrong. Wrong." Later: "That is a mainstream media nonsense put out by her. I was against the war in Iraq."

VIEWER'S GUIDE: Look for trust, temperament themes in debate

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The most telling moments in presidential debates often come out of the blue - an offhand remark or unrehearsed gesture that helps to reveal the essence of a candidate who's already been poked, prodded and inspected for years.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump have competing missions heading into Monday night's leadoff debate of the general election campaign: Hers to overcome the trust questions that have bedeviled her for decades. His to convince voters that he has the good judgment and restraint required of a president.

Seafood caught by foreign crews confined on boats

HONOLULU (AP) — Pier 17 doesn’t even show up on most Honolulu maps. Cars whiz past it on their way to Waikiki’s famous white sand beaches. Yet passing tourists, let alone locals, are unaware that just behind a guarded gate, another world exists: foreign fishermen confined to American boats for years at a time.

OBAMA LEGACY: In energy and pollution

HANGZHOU, China (AP) -- Mostly unnoticed amid the political brawl over climate change, the United States has undergone a quiet transformation in how and where it gets its energy during Barack Obama's presidency, slicing the nation's output of polluting gases that are warming Earth.

Hurricane churns toward HI; people stock up, board up

HILO, Hawaii (AP) -- Preparing for what could be the first hurricane to make landfall in Hawaii in years, residents on the Big Island are stocking up on food and water and seeking shelter for their animals.

The National Weather Service issued a hurricane warning as the storm dubbed Madeline churned west Tuesday toward the island, urging residents to rush through preparations to protect themselves and their property and expect hurricane conditions within the next 36 hours.

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