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Associated Press

Ebola: A crash course in fear and how it hurts us

WASHINGTON (AP) — Ebola is giving Americans a crash course in fear.

Yet, they're incredibly less likely to get the disease than to get sick worrying about it.

First, the reality check: More Americans have married Kim Kardashian — three — than contracted Ebola in the U.S. The two Dallas nurses who came down with Ebola were infected while treating a Liberian man, who became infected in West Africa.



U.S. hospitals grapple with possibility of Ebola

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) -- Step inside All Children's Hospital and you're greeted with three things: hand sanitizer, tissues and masks decorated with little cartoon Band-Aids with legs, feet and smiles. "Dirt Squirt Alert!" a sign says. "Stop the spread of germs that make you and others sick!"



Key facts about hurricane heading toward Hawaii

HONOLULU (AP) -- Residents on Hawaii's southernmost island already dealt with one tropical storm this year and are coping with the threat of slowly encroaching lava. Now, meteorologists say a potential hurricane is heading toward them and the rest of the island chain.

Here are some questions and answers about the latest storm:

WHEN IS IT EXPECTED TO HIT?



US officials defend Ebola response; nurse moved

WASHINGTON (AP) -- In the face of skepticism in Congress, health officials tried to assure the nation Thursday that they can head off an Ebola outbreak in the U.S. despite mistakes that let the deadly virus spread to two nurses and cleared one of them to fly.

The revelation that one of the hospital nurses was allowed on a commercial airline the day before she was diagnosed raised new alarms about the U.S. response to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. Some lawmakers pressed for a ban on travel to the U.S. from the region - a course President Barack Obama is resisting.



2nd Texas health worker tests positive for Ebola

DALLAS (AP) -- Fears of the Ebola virus deepened Wednesday with word that a second Dallas nurse caught the disease from a patient and flew across the Midwest aboard an airliner the day before she was diagnosed. President Barack Obama canceled a campaign trip to address the outbreak.

It's not clear how the nurse contracted the virus, though the second case among health workers pointed to lapses beyond how one individual may have donned and removed protective garb.



Some Mormons pushing church on gay marriage

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) -- Court decisions this week paving the way for same-sex marriage to become legal in dozens of states, including Mormon strongholds like Utah, Idaho and Nevada, have emboldened a growing group of Latter-day Saints who are pushing the conservative church to become more accepting of gay members.

The church's stance toward gays has softened considerably since it was one of the leading forces behind California's ban on gay marriage in 2008, but high-ranking leaders have reiterated time and again the faith's opposition to same-sex unions.



Ex-guard, inmate convicted in Hawaii “USO” gang trial

HONOLULU (AP) — A former guard was found guilty of taking bribes from a Hawaii prison gang to smuggle drugs and cigarettes to prisoners, while an inmate was convicted of leading a brutal attack to maintain his position in the gang.
 



FBI seeks kidnapping suspect in Hawaii and other islands

HONOLULU (AP) — The FBI says a Seattle man charged with the international kidnapping of his 9-year-old son could have sailed with the boy to Hawaii or other Pacific islands.
 
It's not known exactly when Jeffrey Ford Hanson set sail from Seattle with his son, Billy Hanson. They were last seen by authorities Aug. 28.
 
The FBI doesn't know where they went, but Coast Guard nautical experts say they may have traveled to the Hawaiian islands and beyond based on Hanson's sailing skills.
 



Non-English speeches given at Mormon Conference

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) — On a day when two Mormon leaders made history by delivering speeches in foreign languages, the church reiterated its opposition to gay marriage while urging members to be gracious toward those who believe differently.



Ex-inmate describes life in USO prison gang

HONOLULU (AP) - A man who served 20 years for robbery, kidnapping, assault and sexual assault describes some of the inner workings of a Hawaii prison gang.

William Woods says he joined the "USO Family" gang in 2000 while in an Arizona prison where some Hawaii inmates were sent.

Woods testified Friday at a trial for Tineimalo Adkins, the inmate he says recruited him, and Feso Malufau, a former guard accused of taking bribes for smuggling drugs into Halawa Correctional Facility for the gang.



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