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Associated Press

Retail skirmish blocks Apple Pay at checkout line

NEW YORK (AP) -- Plan on paying in stores with your shiny new iPhone 6? Not so fast.

Retailer resistance to Apple Pay had been expected because Apple hasn't offered incentives to install pricey point-of-sale terminals and train staff on its new mobile payment system. But the decision to not accept Apple Pay by retailers that already have contactless terminals in the checkout line is a "skirmish" rooted in competition.



HAWAII LAVA FORCES RESIDENTS TO GET READY TO FLEE

(AP) — Dozens of Hawaii residents have been told they might have to evacuate because molten lava from a volcano is headed toward their homes.

The lava from Kilauea, one of the world's most active volcanos, was about 100 yards from a home Monday morning, Hawaii County Civil Defense officials said.

After months of fitful advancement, the lava crossed Apaa Street on Sunday in Pahoa Village, considered a main town of the Big Island's isolated and rural Puna district. It was getting dangerously close to Pahoa Village Road, which goes straight through downtown.



Mormon founder had teen bride during polygamy days

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) -- The Mormon church acknowledges in a new essay that founder Joseph Smith had a teenage bride and was married to other men's wives during the faith's early polygamous days, a recognition of an unflattering part of its roots that historians have chronicled for years.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints says most of Smith's wives were between 20 and 40 years old. One of them, however, was a 14-year-old girl who was the daughter of Smith's close friends.



Ebola: A crash course in fear and how it hurts us

WASHINGTON (AP) — Ebola is giving Americans a crash course in fear.

Yet, they're incredibly less likely to get the disease than to get sick worrying about it.

First, the reality check: More Americans have married Kim Kardashian — three — than contracted Ebola in the U.S. The two Dallas nurses who came down with Ebola were infected while treating a Liberian man, who became infected in West Africa.



U.S. hospitals grapple with possibility of Ebola

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (AP) -- Step inside All Children's Hospital and you're greeted with three things: hand sanitizer, tissues and masks decorated with little cartoon Band-Aids with legs, feet and smiles. "Dirt Squirt Alert!" a sign says. "Stop the spread of germs that make you and others sick!"



Key facts about hurricane heading toward Hawaii

HONOLULU (AP) -- Residents on Hawaii's southernmost island already dealt with one tropical storm this year and are coping with the threat of slowly encroaching lava. Now, meteorologists say a potential hurricane is heading toward them and the rest of the island chain.

Here are some questions and answers about the latest storm:

WHEN IS IT EXPECTED TO HIT?



US officials defend Ebola response; nurse moved

WASHINGTON (AP) -- In the face of skepticism in Congress, health officials tried to assure the nation Thursday that they can head off an Ebola outbreak in the U.S. despite mistakes that let the deadly virus spread to two nurses and cleared one of them to fly.

The revelation that one of the hospital nurses was allowed on a commercial airline the day before she was diagnosed raised new alarms about the U.S. response to the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. Some lawmakers pressed for a ban on travel to the U.S. from the region - a course President Barack Obama is resisting.



2nd Texas health worker tests positive for Ebola

DALLAS (AP) -- Fears of the Ebola virus deepened Wednesday with word that a second Dallas nurse caught the disease from a patient and flew across the Midwest aboard an airliner the day before she was diagnosed. President Barack Obama canceled a campaign trip to address the outbreak.

It's not clear how the nurse contracted the virus, though the second case among health workers pointed to lapses beyond how one individual may have donned and removed protective garb.



Some Mormons pushing church on gay marriage

SALT LAKE CITY (AP) -- Court decisions this week paving the way for same-sex marriage to become legal in dozens of states, including Mormon strongholds like Utah, Idaho and Nevada, have emboldened a growing group of Latter-day Saints who are pushing the conservative church to become more accepting of gay members.

The church's stance toward gays has softened considerably since it was one of the leading forces behind California's ban on gay marriage in 2008, but high-ranking leaders have reiterated time and again the faith's opposition to same-sex unions.



Ex-guard, inmate convicted in Hawaii “USO” gang trial

HONOLULU (AP) — A former guard was found guilty of taking bribes from a Hawaii prison gang to smuggle drugs and cigarettes to prisoners, while an inmate was convicted of leading a brutal attack to maintain his position in the gang.
 



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