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Associated Press

Too little info about youth concussions

WASHINGTON (AP) -- President Barack Obama called Thursday for more robust research into youth concussions, saying there remains deep uncertainty over both the scope of the troubling issue and the long-term impacts on young people.

"We want our kids participating in sports," Obama said as he opened a daylong summit on concussions at the White House. "As parents though, we want to keep them safe and that means we have to have better information."



How VA clinics falsified appointment records

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Fake appointments, unofficial logs kept on the sly and appointments made without telling the patient are among tricks used to disguise delays in seeing and treating veterans at Veterans Affairs hospitals and clinics.

They're not a new phenomenon. VA officials, veteran service organizations and members of Congress have known about them for years.

The "gaming strategies" were used to make it appear veterans were getting appointments within target times set by the department, according to a 2010 department memo to VA facility managers aimed at fighting the practices.



Kiwi DNA link spurs rethink of flightless birds

WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) -- Research linking New Zealand's diminutive kiwi with a giant extinct bird from Africa is prompting scientists to rethink how flightless birds evolved.

A report published Friday in the journal Science says DNA testing indicates the chicken-size kiwi's closest relative is the elephant bird from Madagascar, which grew up to 3 meters (10 feet) high and weighed up to 250 kilograms (550 pounds) before becoming extinct about 1,000 years ago.



How canoers will use ancient navigation in ocean

HONOLULU (AP) -- When a Polynesian voyaging canoe called the Hokulea embarked on its first trips in Hawaii in the mid-1970s, its crew was trying to prove in part that travel without modern instruments or techniques was possible.

That early crew set out for Tahiti, an island 28 miles wide from more than 2,700 miles away, on a trip that's roughly like leaving Maine and hitting a bull's-eye the size of San Diego, without any roads or landmarks to show the way.

In an era of global positioning satellites, this can seem a relatively mundane feat.



Woman who killed baby at DC convent gets 4 years

WASHINGTON (AP) -- A Samoan woman who acknowledged killing her newborn son at a Washington convent where she was studying to become a nun was sentenced Friday to four years in prison.



Legendary Hawaii canoe embarks Monday on global odyssey

American Samoa students will sail a leg of the journey

HONOLULU (AP) -- To take the Hokulea for a spin off the coast of Oahu is to see the Hawaiian islands in perhaps the same way as their discoverers did hundreds of years ago.

Those seafarers likely arrived on a boat resembling the double-hulled canoe, bridged by a modest deck, compelled by three sails, steered by a rudder, its components held fast with ropes rather than screws or nails.



APNewsBreak: Ex-players: NFL illegally used drugs

WASHINGTON (AP) -- A group of retired NFL players says in a lawsuit filed Tuesday that the league, thirsty for profits, illegally supplied them with risky narcotics and other painkillers that numbed their injuries for games and led to medical complications down the road.



Studies: Wildfires worse due to global warming

WASHINGTON (AP) -- The devastating wildfires scorching Southern California offer a glimpse of a warmer and more fiery future, according to scientists and federal and international reports.



Study: Tropical cyclones migrating out of tropics

WASHINGTON (AP) -- Tropical cyclones worldwide are moving out of the tropics and more toward the poles and generally larger populations, likely because of global warming, a surprising new study finds. Atlantic hurricanes, however, don't follow this trend.



Part Of West Antarctic Ice Sheet Starting Slow, Unstoppable Collapse, Studies Indicate

WASHINGTON (AP) — The huge West Antarctic ice sheet is starting a glacially slow collapse in an unstoppable way, two new studies show. Alarmed scientists say that means even more sea level rise than they figured.

The worrisome outcomes won't be seen soon. Scientists are talking hundreds of years, but over that time the melt that has started could eventually add 4 to 12 feet to current sea levels.



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