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Associated Press

Google's safe browsing system targets 'unwanted software'

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- Get ready to see more red warning signs online as Google adds ammunition to its technological artillery for targeting devious schemes lurking on websites.

The latest weapon is aimed at websites riddled with "unwanted software" - a term that Google uses to describe secretly installed programs that can change a browser's settings without a user's permission. Those revisions can unleash a siege of aggravating ads or redirect a browser's users to search engines or other sites that they didn't intend to visit.



Global outage shuts down Apple's iTunes, App stores

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) -- Apple's widely used iTunes and app stores suffered a rare breakdown Wednesday, frustrating millions of music lovers and mobile device owners around the world.

The outages were still vexing the iPhone and iPad as of 1:30 p.m. Eastern time, based on status updates posed by Apple Inc. By then, the both the iTunes and app stores had been inaccessible for several hours to the exasperation of Apple users venting on social media and online forums.



UN: World eating too much sugar

LONDON (AP) -- New guidelines from the World Health Organization are enough to kill anyone's sugar high. The U.N. health agency says the world is eating too much sugar and people should slash their intake to just six to 12 teaspoons per day - an amount that could be exceeded with a single can of soda.

So, put down that doughnut. And while you're at it, skip the breakfast cereal, fruit juice, beer and ketchup.



Hawaii police officer arrested after bicyclist killed

KAILUA-KONA, Hawaii (AP) — A 30-year-old police officer on Hawaii's Big Island was arrested and placed on administrative leave after he hit with his car and killed a bicyclist visiting from Michigan

Hawaii Island police officer Jody Buddemeyer was arrested on suspicion of negligent homicide in connection with the death Sunday morning of Jeffrey Sunow, 63, of West Bloomfield, Michigan, according to West Hawaii Today, a newspaper in Kailua-Kona.



How did West Coast ports get so jammed? And what comes next?

LOS ANGELES (AP) — After reaching a tentative contract agreement that covers the West Coast's 29 seaports, dockworkers are clearing an immense backlog of cargo that accumulated as their negotiations with employers stalled.

Overall, the ports handle roughly one-quarter of U.S. international trade, an amount worth about $1 trillion annually.

With the contract impasse resolved, here are some questions and answers about how we got here and what comes next:

JUST HOW BAD IS THE CARGO BACKLOG?



Most West Coast ports bustling again after labor deal

OAKLAND, Calif. (AP) — Nearly all West Coast seaports began the work week with crews hustling to load and unload cargo ships that were held up amid a months-long dispute over a new contract for dockworkers.

The exception Monday was the Port of Oakland, where problems persisted three days after negotiators for the dockworkers' union and for employers reached a tentative agreement covering all 29 West Coast ports. Those ports handle roughly one-quarter of U.S. international trade, an amount worth about $1 trillion annually.



Crews free humpback whale tangled in fishing line off Hawaii

video courtesy NOAA via Hawaii News Now

KAILUA-KONA, Hawaii (AP) -- Officials say a 45-ton humpback whale entangled with fishing line in Hawaii waters for more than a week is finally free.

The Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary said Saturday that its craft got within 10 feet of the mammal a day earlier and the crew used a pole equipped with a knife to saw the line free.

Ed Lyman of the sanctuary says several hundred feet of line was cut away.



West Coast seaports tackle huge cargo backlog

LOS ANGELES (AP) -- Parked off the Southern California coast is an armada of ships bulging with containers holding a shopper's delight of goods that would already be on store shelves, but for a labor dispute that has disrupted international trade for months.

The volume of cargo that West Coast dockworkers and their employers must clear, now that they've reached a tentative contract agreement Friday evening, is staggering. Put in a line, the containers would stretch 579 miles; stacked up, they'd rise nearly 250 miles - about the orbiting altitude of the International Space Station.



Antarctica holds key to mankind's future

DECEPTION ISLAND, Antarctica (AP) -- Earth's past, present and future come together here on the northern peninsula of Antarctica, the wildest, most desolate and mysterious of its continents.

Clues to answering humanity's most basic questions are locked in this continental freezer the size of the United States and half of Canada: Where did we come from? Are we alone in the universe? What's the fate of our warming planet?



Two sides in ports dispute reach tentative contract

LOS ANGELES (AP) -- Negotiators reached a tentative contract covering West Coast dockworkers on Friday evening, likely ending a protracted labor dispute that snarled international trade at seaports handling about $1 trillion worth of cargo annually.

The breakthrough came after nine months of talks that turned contentious in the fall, when dockworkers and their employers began blaming each other for problems getting imports to consumers and exports overseas.



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